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^^'ophetstown Centennial 1859-1959 




The Bank of Tomorrow That Serves You Today 



THE BOARD 

LENA AYLSWORTH 
F. E. BREED 
C. A. CONRAD 



OF DIRECTORS 

FRANK L. DUDLEY 
LILAH M. WEBURG 
DONALD L. SIPE 



HOWARD H. MATTHEWS 

THE OFFICERS 

FRANK L. DUDLEY, President 

F. E. BREED, Vice-President 

C. A. CONRAD, Cashier 

LILAH M. WEBURG, Assistant Cashier 



THE 

MISS ARLINE WHEAT 
MISS MACY ROMAN 
MRS. DAVID LANPHERE 
MISS CHARLOTTE TENBOER 



STAFF 

MRS. ARNOLD SWANSON 
MRS. LYLE FULLER 
MRS. CHARLES EMERY 
RALPH WILDMAN 



MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE BANK 




A View From Thunderbolt 

Three miles southwest of Prophetstown rises the highest point in this area — 
an elevation overlooking Rock River, our fertile fields and our beloved Prophetstown. 
To us, living on the plains, she is a mountain called Thunderbolt. 



The name Thunderbolt is synonomous with the Indian lore of our town. It was 
at her summit that the Chief Blackhowk camped for several days with more than 500 
painted warriors preparing an attack designed to recover thousands of acres of In- 
dian lands so recently taken from him. 

The beautiful Rock River and fertile fields remain; the view from Thunderbolt 
changes. It is the record of these changes that is presented here. This is not a com- 
plete history of Prophetstown, but is a book dsdicated to all men and women whose 
spirit and determination throughout the years contributed to the social, religious and 
economic progress of the city of which we are so proud. 

In recording this changing scene ws allude to many names and places. There 
are many persons unnamed who have made important contributions. These omissions 
are not intentional — all persons, named and unnamed, have enlarged THE VIEW 
FROM THUNDERBOLT. , ,, _ ii 

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L. K. Groharing 

Mayor of Prophetstown, III. 

Through Congressman Leo Allen I have learned of the 100th 
Anniversary of the Village of Prophetstown and it is a pleasure to 
join in the observance of this event. Located on good land and settled 
by enterprising folk Prophetstov\/n has prospered over the years. 
Because of your towns fine traditions and its community life. The 
View from Thunderbolt looks most promising for the future. 



Congratulations and Best Wishes. 



Dwight D. Eisenhower 



From the Prophet: Prophetstown 



(Wabo — meaning white or light colored: kie- 
shiek — meaning sky or heaven.) Wa-bo-kie-shiek 
was generally known as White Cloud, a prophet 
or medicine man. He ruled his village on Rock 
River 35 miles from the mouth of that river at the 
site of the present village of Prophetstown. 

His mother was a Sauk and his father was a 
Winnebago, which tribe seemed to predominate in 
this area. His relatives to both tribes gave him 
greater influence. 

Those who knew the Prophet and were assoc- 
iated with him have left a written description of his 
personal appearance. He was described as being 
six feet tall, stout and athletic of figure, with a count- 
enance in keeping with a militant disposition. He 
had a broad, large mouth, a short blunt nose, large 
full eyes, thick lips, with a full suit of hair. He wore 
a white headress which rose several inches above 
the top of his head, the whole exhibiting a delib- 
erate savageness — not that he seemed to delight in 
honorable war or fight but marking him as the 
priest af assassination or secret murder. 

White Cloud had much native ability, shrewd- 
ness, and power of oratory. 

George Catlin made several sketches of the 
Prophet. He sent some of them to a noted artist by 
the name of Healy in Paris, who made the original 
of the composition which now hangs in the White- 
side County Courthouse in Morrison. 




Our Native Background 



It is felt by many people that they must look 
to far way places for items of great interest. For 
instance, Italy for music; Greece for art and legend; 
or to Egypt for antiquity. However, all the arts and 
delights may be found, in some form, at their very 
doors, if eyes and ears are in tune with the sur- 
roundings. 

There is music in the voices of children at play, 
me song of bird and the rustling of the leaves. Arts 
and legends concerning our community are num- 
erous. There are legends of the red man, who 
lived and hunted along the river, Sinnissippi, known 
today as the Rock River. As for antiquity, one has 
but to notice Nature's age-old footsteps to find 
shore lines of ancient seas, those seas whose 
surges beat on the shores, when only reptiles and 
and mere beginnings of animal life inhabited the 
then giant tropical forests. 

Deep in the soil are buried ancient forests, 
which have come down to us since the world was 
young. Vast beds of peat are to be found in this 
locale which show the method nature uses to build 
her great coal beds. 

The story of man here reads like a romance 
and takes us back to the misty past, beyond the 
times of recorded history. 

The mound builders left their monuments, 
which were great oval shaped mounds. They 
served as burial places of the people and their 
articrafts. Such mounds are to be found in groups 
along local rivers and streams. 

The Rock River valley was occupied by the 
Sauks, Foxes and Winnebagoes, the latter being a 
tribe of the Dakotas. They were once a powerful 
race but were finally defeated and almost de- 
stroyed by wars. They were allies of the British in 
the War of 1812. 

In the early 1800's there were fourteen Indian 
villages scattered along Rock River. The principal 
one v/as at Prophet's town. 

Begirming in 1829 and 1830, a great effort was 
being made to remove the Indians from these 
parts to lands west of the Mississippi River. Black 
Hawk, chief of the Sauks, didn't want to give up 
this lovely valley of the Rock River with its fertile 
fields. It is said that he had 800 acres under culti- 
vation. Hov/ever, the continued effort on the white 
man's part, finally brought about the great conflict 
known as the Black Hawk War. The war was 
waged under the leadership of the great Indian 
chief, Black Hov/k, and his untiring aide-de-camp, 
Wa-bo-kie-shiek, the Prophet. The Indians were de- 
feated and agreed to the transfer of lands according 



to the treaty. However, Black Hawk repudiated the 
treaty. Returning with a large band of warriors, he 
began a, second war — again under advice of the 
Prophet and the promise of his aid. 

The Prophet continued to encourage Black 
Hawk to oppose the whites by telling him that all 
of his braves, who had met death previously, would 
rise up from their graves and join him in the fray 
against the enemy. 

It is said that when Black Hawk came here 
that spring, the Prophet encamped him at what is 
now known as Thunderbolt Hill, near Portland. (The 
hill was named for Chief Thunderbolt.) The Prophet, 
knowing that war was inevitable, did not wish to 
have his village involved. Nevertheless, early in 
the second war the Prophets' village was burned by 
government volunteers under Gen. Samuel White- 
side, for whom our county was named. 

Following the Rock River, the Federal Army 
trailed Black Hawk into Wisconsin at the final bat- 
tle of the Black Hawk War, the Indian forces were 
annihilated. Black Hawk, the Prophet, and about 
twenty warriors escaped and fled. The army or- 
dered some of the Winnebego braves to capture 
Black Hawk and the Prophet. They overtook the 
fugitives near the Dalles of the Wisconsin River. 
'I'he two chiefs were confined until 1833 in Fortress 
Monroe. The president ordered their release and 
they were returned to their own country. 

Black Hawk died in an Indian village on the 
DesMoines River in Iowa in 1838. He had been an 
intelligent and brave chief, causing the United 
States government much trouble. 

The great spirit long ago sang the death of 
the Prophet. The incidents of his life and career 
are numerous. He had been a kind and generous 
friend to many a way -faring white man. He had 
recovered many stray horses from the Indians and 
restored them to their rightful owners, without ask- 
ing recompense. 

In 1837 the Sauks and most of the Foxes were 
removed to an Indian Reservation in Kansas. It 
was there that the Prophet died in 1841. 

After the Black Hawk War there was very lit- 
tle Indian trouble in this locality. In the year 1835 
there were about three or four hundred Indians 
(stragglers) living near the mouth of Coon Creek. 
They were neighborly and traded with the White 
men, but slowly took their leave and went west- 
ward. 

Legend has it that the early settlers were 
amazed at the sight of small Indian children run- 



ning from their dwellings barefoot and sliding 
across the ice on Coon Creek — then hurrying back 
into their homes for warmth. 

One woman said that her ancestors, as chil- 
dren, played with the little Indians. One day an 
Indian baby was taken to a white child's home 
where it was bathed and dressed in white baby's 
clothing. Later the baby became ill and the inci- 
dent nearly incited the natives to the warpath! 

The red man was not always hostile from 
choice. He should not be too severly censured, for 
he had received much bad treatmnt at the hands 
of the whites. After all, he was fighting for the only 
home he had ever known. He would not have been 
human had he not fought to the last ditch. Even in 
his last throes of desperation, he neither asked nor 
gave quarter. If we were put to the same today, it 
is almost certain that we would not give up this ver- 
dant valley without the same tenacious resistance. 

The records of Earl Ellithorpe, early owner of 
the Jim Fisk farm, say that during his early resi- 
dence there, two Indian families came one fall and 
stayed a year, camping most of the time across 
the river. While living there, an Indian child died. 
Often in evening the squaw was heard wailing 
and mourning for her child. When winter came 
these families moved into a grove and peeled 
black walnut bark to use in making wigwams. 

A son of a Portland pioneer related that when 
he attended Portland school more Indians passed 
the school daily than white persons. 

Squaws with papooses on their backs would 
sometimes go into the school house to get warm. 
They set the papooses against the wall. The In- 
dians never entered a home or the school without 
first peeping through the window. 

The Indians were peaceable. Often little In- 
dian boys came to school, not to enter into class- 
work, but to play during noon intermission. They 
enjoyed wrestling, running, and target practice 
with bows and arrows. Sometimes the white boys 
traded part of their lunch with the Indian boys for 
bows and arrows. 

The Indian children were more quiet and re- 
served than their white friends. They talked most- 
ly by signs and motions. 

Indians were persistent beggars, begging 
mostly for m.eat, particulary pork. When they were 
given apples, potatoes, etc., in a pan, they always 
insisted it should be heaping full. It is said an 
early housewife gave a chicken to some begging 
Indians, and they strippecj off the feathers before 
killing it. 

The following account was copied from an old 
newspaper clipping written by Mrs. Augustus 
Wildman, a former local teacher. 

"Of historical importance, locally, is the fact 



that the only hostility of the Black Hawk War, in 
which Capt. Abraham Lincoln's company partici- 
pated, was when the Winnebago village was des- 
troyed at the Prophet's town. He was in command 
of one of the four companies of the Fourth Regi- 
ment of Illinois Volunteers. 

"There are no records of the exact part played 
by the twenty-three-year-old Lincoln at the burning 
of the Prophet's town. However, he is known to 
have been one of the volunteers who set the In- 
dian village up in flames. For some reason, histor- 
ians have failed to mention the fact that it was Lin- 
coln's only participation in actual Black Hawk War 
hostilities. 

"Some authorities state that the Illniois Volun- 
teers spent the night at the present site of Prophets- 
town, after burning the Indian village. If this were 
true, Capt. Lincoln was one of them." 

Forming of Prophetstown Township 

Prophetstown township originally formed a 
part of Crow Creek precinct. In March, 1837, while 
Whiteside County was still a part of Ogle County 
the county commissioners included all the territory 
in the county south of Rock River, in a precinct 
called Prophetstown. 

In 1840 the recent precinct was divided into 
three precincts called Rapids, Prophetstown, and 
Portland. Prophetstown precinct then embraced 
the present township and the western half of Hume 
and Tampico until 1850, when the county adopted 
the township organization low. 

Commissioners were appointed to give names 
and boundaries to townships. After several changes 
of names and boundaries, the name of Prophets- 
town was applied to the township as it now exists. 

Prophetstown township contains 30,191 acres 
of land, being considerably in excess of any other 
township in the county. The general surface of the 
land is level and the soil is rich and fertile — a veri- 
table "Garden of Eden." 




Earlv Settlers Endure Fear and Hardships 



Alists oj time obscure the vielP of our ewUest his- 
lorv and jamilies. From records available we see 
the foUoU'mg families being the founders of our 
communiiv. 



One of the first wfiite settlers in the Prophets- 
town area was Asa Crook who moved here from 
Michigan and started farming in June, 1834. Mr. 
Crook vras elected Justice of the Peace in 1835 and 
appointed Postmaster in 1836. After living for sev- 
eral years in a log house, Mr. Crook and his fam- 
ily moved into a large two story frame house. Be- 
cause this was the largest house between Dixon 
and Rock Island, it was used as on inn. Part of 
this building still stands at the site of the present 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Wagencht. 

John W. Stakes, a native of Ohio, arrived in 
Prophetstown in September, 1834. Mr. Stakes was 
the father of the first child born in Prophetstown — 
Mary Arm Stakes, bom October 19, 1835. Mary 
Ann's birth was also that of the first white child in 




Mrs. John W. Stakes '^^''V A. Stakes McEnight 

the to-iz/nship and the first white girl baby bom in 
Whiteside County. John Stakes ran the ferry across 
Rock River for several years before moving to 
Union Grove Precinct. He died in Morrison in 1861. 

The first settlement on Benton Street was made 
by Harry Smith. He and William Hill had come all 
the way from Rutland County, Vermont, with teams 
in 1835. Mr. Hill was a carpenter and wheelwright 




■ by trade but became a successful farmer. He was 
instrumental in the construction of the first log 
school building in Prophetstown Township in 1836. 

Marvin Frary of Massachusetts made his claim 
between the villages of Prophetstown and Portland 
in 1835. In addition to farming, he was engaged for 
a time in the distilling business in Portland. 

J. Sperry Johnson moved to Prophetstown from 
Vermont in 1835. He operated a large farm in the 
southwest comer of the township where he lived 
until his death in 1876. 

Nathaniel G. Reynolds arrived in Prophetstown 
in June, 1835, having crossed the prairie from Chi- 




Edward S. Gage 



cago on an Indian trail. He was engaged in fann- 
ing for many years and was elected County Com- 
missioner in 1839 and County Judge in 1849. Mr. 
Reynolds moved to Sterling in 1860 and died there 
in 1865. 

Prophetstown's first wedding was the marriage 
of Isaac Colin Southard and Almira Hill in 1836. 
Mr. Southard had moved here in the same year 
from Vermont and operated a large farm on Wash- 
ington Street. Four children were born to this 
couple. 




Mrs. Edward S. Gage 

Other arrivals that year were Thompson F. 
Clark, Edward S. Gage, Joshua F. Walker and 
Lewis Brown. 

Among the settlers who came to Prophetstown 
in 1837 were Freeman J. Walker, William R. Mc- 
Kenzie, Harmon Smith, John S. Warner, Ashley 
Booth, Calvin Williams and John Farnum. 

Another newcomer in 1837 was Alanson Stow- 
ell. In the Bent-Wilson "History of Whiteside County" 
th?re is an account of his wife which brings out 
the hardships of the 1837 housewifes: 

"In the early days of the settlement there 
were no mills nearby to grind wheat and com, 
n3cessitating the settlers to resort to hand 



mills when they wanted flour or corn meal. 
Neither were these mills very plenty. An inci- 
dent in connection with the trouble in getting 
com ground at that time is related by Mrs. 
Stowell, formerly Annette Nichols. She at one 
time carried a half bushel of corn on her back 
to Sampson Ellithorpe's, to be ground, Mr. 
Ellithorpe being the happy possessor of a hand 
mil!. After she had transformed the com into 
m=al, shf took Earl Ellithorpe, then about two 
years old, on one shoulder, the meal on the 
other, a small babe in her arms, and with the 
other child, a little girl, now Mrs. Dr. Donaldson, 
of Morrison, hanging to her dress, crossed the 
creek on a fallen log. It needed a strong nerve 
and a steady one to perform that feat, and our 
pioneer had both. Buckwheat ground in a com- 
mon coffee-mill, and baked into cake, was also 
a staple diet. Grain, however, was plenty, and 
potatoes excellent, the old Nerchannocks being 
the favorite variety, so with appetites such as 
ague only can create, the settlers did not mind 
the quality as much as they did the quantity. 

Erastus G. Nicols also came to Prophetstown in 
1837 and settled on the bonk of Coon Creek near 
the confluence with Rock River. The next year he 
built a sawmill here which almost ruined him fin- 
ancially as his losses exceeded $8,000. In 1840, he 
was one of three who contracted to dig the canal 
around the Rock River Rapids, beginning the work 
at Rock Falls. He was the first Postmaster when a 
separate post office was etablished at Prophets- 
town in 1844. He died of smallpox the next year. 

Coming to Illinois in 1837, David Underhill re- 
mained for a while at a place near Rockford. In 
September that year, he paddled down Rock River 
in a canoe to Prophetstown. He made his first claim 
on Benton Street and later moved to Jefferson Com- 
ers. 

William T. Minchin, who moved here in Octo- 
ber, 1837 made his claim on Washington St. near 
Jefferson Comers. In 1844, his improvements were 
destroyed by tornado. He was elected clerk of the 
Village Council after Prophetstown was incorpor- 
ated in 1859. 

On the first day of June in 1837 Jabez Warner 
with two of his sons, came up Rock River on a flat 
boat carrying a stock of goods. They stopped at 
Prophetstown and tound that Daniel Crocker had 
just recently left the village. Mr. Crocker had op- 
erated what is thought to be the first store in the 
county. The store was opened in a log cabin on the 
bank of the river in 1836. Mr. Crocker later added 
a sort of frame building made of hewn timber and 
covered with split clapboards. Mr. Wamer moved 
his goods into the same building. He formed a 
partnership with Simon Page and they increased 
their stock. There were many Indians here that 
year, and with the whites, made the business quite 
successful. Black Hawk's youngest daughter bought 
her wedding outfit from Mr. Warner. The next year 



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Dt. Cora L. Reed J. Sperry Johnson 






"wiSiout ■wi^.do^v-s. Their provisions vrsrs com irsciG., 
frrzsn pork and pototogs. Th.s piece ^tcs insn in 



for the ho'-isshoid. He "iTaiks-d io ALoony, a distance 
eigiit miles fuTLtier. Us reiumsd. to Union Grcv® 

of record. Another son, Daniel Oimstead, erectea 




Mr. and Mrs. Elios C. Hutchinson 
~--:= Z. -■:—'—-— a native of Pennsylvania, 

'ed in the f".imir.;re trade in the village. 



ne haa ctohs to se_ 
irtoi>ert Smith starts 

^nn rl a lioht 3r.C'''~ 



-c^/ . ne reramea eosi 
-.a: -.'.--nter he froze to 

5 prairie, they discov- 
: across Ha7.'.-ly's Point 



frozen. 

ill-fctted Srip' frnm Dixon had come here ia 1838 and 
had settled near Jefferson Comers. He married 
jri^Ess Christine Lee and they had r.TC children 
Richard and Lucy. 

-.'.-ho came feoia Nevr York in 1837. He maae claim 
in 3633 CTt the bluff and resided there his lifethne. 




Elios Hutchinson Home 




A. I. Mattson 



Mrs. A. J. Mattson 



Stephen D. Smith, coming from Vermont in 
1639, settled on Washington Street on a farm later 
known as the Ezra Hill farm. Mr. Smith later located 
on a farm adjoining the village. In 1871, he sold 
his farm to his son, D. Kenerett Smith and Luther 
Ramsay who laid it out into the village lots. Most of 
the building was done on this land for some time. 
Stephen Smith had a daughter, Caroline, who was 
married to Luther Ramsay. His son. D. Kenerett, 
married Miss Alma Green and they lived here 
their entire lives. 

Coming to Prophetstown in the spring of 1839, 
Obadiah W. Gage first worked at his trade as a 
shoemaker. Later he opened a farm on Jackson 
Street where he lived his lifetime. He was County 
Commissioner in 1848 and Supervisor of Prophets- 
town Township for six terms. He married Miss Mer- 
cy Farrington and had two children, Augusta and 
Euretta. 

Johnson W. Gage came here in 1839 and was 
Township Assessor for fifteen years and School 
Director for ten years. He married Miss Emily Wil- 
liams and they were the parents of ten children. 

Moving to Prophtstown in 1839, Silas Martin 
remained but two years when he moved to Coloma 
where he died. His wife was killed in 1841 by the 
accidental discharge of a gun while she was out 
riding. Among their children was Harriet who 
married William O. McKenzie of Prophetstown. 

Luther B. Ramsay, mentioned above in con- 
nection with building with Stephen Smith, alsoj 
came from New York. He settled in town after farm-' 
ing in Hume for three years. He was also engaged 
in mercantile business in the village and man- 
ufactured cheese, having a splendid dairy farm in 
the center of the township. His son, Frank D. Ram- 
say, was a successful lawyer in Morrison. 

Sampson Ellithorpe came from New York and 
settled in Hume Township. He sold his claim soon 
and moved west of Prophetstown to the farm where 
the James Fisk family now lives. He married Miss 
Eliza Wright and had two children. Earl, who spent 
his entire life here, and Bethiah, wife of Dr. H. C. 
Donaldson, one of the early practicing physicians 
of the county. 



A blacksmith, Horace Annis, came here 1839. 
He was connected with the plow factory from 1854 
to 1859 when he moved to Colorado. He married 
Mrs. Portia Nichols. Among their chidren was Julia, 
wife of Hamden Sturtevant, who remained in 
Prophetstown. 

Lawrence Walls, a native of Ireland, came here 
in 1840 and purchased a farm east of Coon Creek, 
living there his lifetime. He married Philena Clark, 
and after her death, Clarissa White. 

In 1835, Edward Wright came to Prophetstown 
in the company of William Perkins. At that time 
there were no houses on the south side of Rock 
River from Dixon down until the grove just above 
Prophetstown was reached, where there were two 
cabins. They made a claim adjoining Asa Crook's 
which took in the land on which the village of 
Prophetstown stood, and also enough of the bend 
of the river below to make what they considered 
two good-sized farms. In 1836 Mr. Wright sold his 
share to Jabez Warner. 

Henry L. TuUer moved to Prophetstown in 1842 
having been in the mercantile business at Albany 
before coming here. He purchased the store here of 
Frederick Dwight and did business in the county 
until 1848, when he moved to Peru, Illinois. 

Jeduthon Seely, Jr. settled in Prophetstown in 
1836. He married Mariba Foy and among their chil- 
dren who remained in Prophetstown were Celestia, 
wife of E. Ballou, and Tamson, wife of Jones Nich- 
ols. 

Nathan Thompson came here in 1843 and was 
in business his lifetime in Prophetstown. He was 
connected with Andrew Tuller as a dealer in Gen- 
eral merchandise. He was engaged with William 
Pratt and others in digging county ditches. He was 
influential in all railroad enterprises from the start 
of the first project until the completion of the first 
road through the village. Also, he was president 
of the First National Bank. 




Lucy Gage Tracy ^ y g^^j^y 

Alexander G. Thompson came here in 1838 and 
settled on Jackson Street. He married Almeda 
Gault and had six children. One son, George, died 
while in the service at New Orleans during the 
Civil War. 




The following priests have administered to the needs of the parish: 
Father J. V. Walsh 1917-1920 Father David Murphy 1927-1933 

Father John Egan 1920-1921 Father Ambrose Weitekamp 1933-1946 

Father Frank Keenan 1921-1927 Father John W. Vaughn 1946-1957 
Father Robert Donovan 1957- 




ST. CATHERINE PARISH 




Sol Seeley 



A. J. Warner 



William Thompson came to Prophetstown with 
his brother Alexander in 1838. He remained here 
until 1866 when he moved to Iowa. He married 
Mary Cleaveland and six children were bom to 
this couple. 

There are many other names important in the 
history of Prophetstown — names such as Porter, 
Dickinson, Newton, Emery, Hull, Fenn, Green, Bald- 
win. In fact names of every family living here has 
left its imprint on the development of the city. 
Realizing this, we have written only of the early 
families whose histories have been recorded. 




Eva Emery Dye 



Eva Emery Dye was bom in Prophetstown on 
July 17, 1855, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus 
Emery. 

She attend Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio. 
She later became a teacher and a writer. She 
moved to Oregon City, Oregon, with her husband 
who "svas a lawyer. Besidet. raising a Icmily, she 
found time to wr-'.e many books, som^ of v/hich are 
"Stories of Old Oregon", "The Conquest", "The 
Story of Lewis and Clark", and "Portland, Mt. 
Hood and the Columbia". 



The following poem was written about 45 years 
ago by Louisa Woodworth, whose graddaughter, 
Mrs. Lloyd Simester lives in Dunkerton, Iowa. 



To Prophetstown 

When Indians roamed the Middle- 
West, 

An old Rock River did it's best 

To help the Redman in his quest 

For food and transportation. 
The Redman chose this goodly spot. 

To pitch their wigwams, as they ought. 

Their chieftain was the "Prophet." 
Naught 

Could give them information 
As could this prophet, wise and bold. 

Who ruled this place in days of old, 
and prophesied, so we are told. 

Before white immigration. 

The Redman thot this prophet knew. 
And told them things that would 
come true. 

And always looked upon him too, 
with eyes of adoration. 

Then came the white man in his quest 
For trade and knowledge and the 
rest 
Of things the white men loves the 
best; 
Some call it speculation. 

They named the townsite Prophets- 
town 

Alter the chief of great renown. 
Some think it should be called Profits-town. 

We think that's expectation. 

The Prophet sleeps on Thunderbolt 
hill 
Or did sleep there, they say, until 
Some white men sought his bones, 
to fill 
His head with information. 
Of what the Redman used to be. 
Before the white man came and 
he 



ECLIPSE LAWN MOWERS 



ECLIPSE WASP CHAIN SAWS 




THE ECLIPSE LAWN MOWER CO. 



DIVISION OF BUFFALO-ECLIPSE CORPORATION 



INCORPORATED 1902 



Stepped down and out, no more to b=?. 

And what was their relation. 
But Prophetstown long since outgrew 

Her trading post and wigwams too. 
To old has given place to new. 

Far more than expectation. 

Red man and white, who were then 
so fleet. 
Have crossed the river where the 
two worlds meet. 
Still others and others have followed 
their feet 
Grown tired of time's rotation 

And Prophetstown may well be p''oud 

Of those who have passed on with 
the crowd. 
As well as those who are shouting 
loud. 

For modern innovation. 
Of those who wish the town to bs. 

The town the people wish to see. 
And it is apparently. 

Quite close to realization. 

Our factories are turning out. 

Some things our neighbors talk 
about 

And other things without a doubt, 
Are worth their imitation. 

When nature seems to spill and spout 
And railroads kick their bridges 
out, 

Old Prophetstown's still on the route 
Of rapid transportation. 

Our churches all men view with pnd^. 

Their doors are always open wide. 
And good will found on every side. 

Fulfills our expectation. 

O, little place called Prophetstown, 
On maps you're not of much re- 
nown. 

But people here your head will crown, 
with goodly reputation. 

Lou Woodworth 



This poem was written by Mrs. Amanda Rey- 
nolds Smith, daughter of Nathaniel Gardner Rey- 
nolds. It was read by her at the Old Settlers meet- 
ing at Hamilton Grove in the year 1882. 

Of eighteen hundred thirty-five, few are alive 
To relate the stories of frontier land. 
Of crossing the prairies through wet and cold. 
With naught but the lone tree to point out the road. 



From Paw Paw Grove we struck across 

rioin setting in with fog on the morass. 

Darkness enveloped us on every hand, 

Slowly the night hours passed by our little band. 

Morning dawned not a tree in sight. 
No kindling of fire, all water and mud. 
Provisions were cold, appetites very poor. 
This jamping on prairie was not very good. 

Father, mother, brothers three. 
Hours we watched for the lone, lone tree. 
Father in the water above his knees. 
Mother, she cried, "The tree 1 can't see". 

Wagons three all fast in the mud. 
On the backs of horses we all of us mount, 
Every eye in search for the lone lost tree. 
With joy we are met by Mr. Farrington. 

None can picture the feelings of this lost band. 
As we clasp the hand of this kindhearted man. 
He saved us from death or a night of distress. 
God grant his spirit in peace does rest. 

On reaching Coon Creek — no other way. 
Water very cold, horses had to swim 
Wagon box floats, horses headed upstream. 
Now we are through looking for the lone tree. 

Seated by the fire at Asa Crook's 
Mother clasps babe and says with her looks 
What can repay me for this torture of mind 
But to secure homes for this little group. 

The winter was cold provisions were short. 
Seven families in all in a little log hut. 
Measles broke out, seventeen children by the way 
Sixty miles for a doctor and that wouldn't pay. 

Indians calling by day and night 
Faces at windows, oh, horror, what a sight! 
Picture the children with beds on the floor. 
Trembling with fear at the sight of the warrior. 

Well do I remember a warrior that came 
To visit the tribe of our little town. 
The cleaning of guns preparations were made 
To fight on the morrow if necessities need. 

Brave, noble mothers, with babies in arms. 
Fathers seeking a country to make them a farm 
May their children arise and call them blessed. 
For braving the storms and making homes in the 
west. 

All this has now passed away. 

With only a few to tell the sad tale. 

How they braved the storm and traveled along 

And made this a country of beauty and song. 

Peace be to those who have thus passed away 
May they meet with us in spirit on anniversary day. 
Inspire our hearts with benevolence and love 
For all that have come since 1835. 




X ii 

CLARKS LOCKER SERVICE 

Where Meat is Cut 
The Way YOU Like It. 



Office Tele. 3171 



Home 3191 



DARI-DELITE 



Sundaes - Sodas - Milk Shakes 



Malted Milks 



Root Beer 



Infra-Ray-Broiled Hamburgers 



and 



Other Sandwiches 



LAWRENCE'S 



SERVING YOUR 

BANKING NEEDS 
25 YEARS 

1934-1959 



OF STERLING 



STERLING, ILLINOIS 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




THE PROPHETSTOWN 
TELEPHONE COMPANY 

106 E. RAILROAD STREET 

1903 • • • 1959 

Not 100 years old, but has been furnishing 
the Town and Community with Telephone 
Service for Fifty-Six years. 



Early Pioneer's Struggle 



A vivid picture of life in these eaii^ times is re- 
corded in the autobiography of N . G. Reynolds 
another early settler. Excerpts of this biography 
Written in Eighteen hundred sixty are : 




Naihcmiel G. Reynolds 



. . . "I bid adieu again to aristocracy and took 
my journey from the far west on the 9th of Oct., 
1S35, with my family consisting of wife and five 
cliildren. We came from Buffalo to Detroit by boat, 
from Detroit to Chicago. The roads were as bad as 
anyone would wish to see from Chicago to Rock 
River, was only Indian trail. Camped out two 
nights. 

"Got along tolerably well until the 9th of Nov- 
ember we had to cross the prairie from Inlet Grove 
to where Prophetstown now is, forty-four miles with- 




out a house or a road; the Lone Tree our only 
guide. I had three wagons, five horses and two 
yoke of oxen. We left at four o'clock a.m.; about 
nine o'clock it commenced raining, rained all day 
and all night. We traveled all day and I supposed 
reached half way — formed a hollow square with 
our wagons, put the horses and cattle in the center 
and crawled into the wagons. It rained and spit 
snow. Snow with a heavy wind from the northwest 
in the morning. At day break we harnessed up and 
proceeded on our journey. 

"The rain had flooded the prairie in many 
places and made it so soft that my teams could not 
take our loads. I left one wagon and lightened the 
others. liad not proceeded over one-fourth mile 
when we got in another slough. It was raining and 
snowing and the teams altogether could not pull 
one wagon. We abandoned the wagons. Mrs. Rey- 
nolds go'i on one horse with the youngest child. 1 
took two with me. We traveled until dark and had 
to swim Raccoon Creek which we did in safety and 
soon came to a cabin, and were made happy by 
refreshments and fire with a good sleep on the soft 
side of a hewed plank. Three days afterwards I re- 
lumed for my wagons, found all right. 1 camped 
that night and returned next day. Cold increasing 
and fair prospect of winter setting in. Here I was 
with five horses, two yoke of oxen and seven dol- 
lars in cash. No hoy or grain nor provisions (only 
what I had in my wagon) nearer than seventy 
miles, no roads nor bridges on the way. 

Knoxville was Egypt for us, it being the nearest 
point we could get provisions. 

"I started with the teams in company with one 
of my neighbors and a pilot for the land of com. 
Swam Green River, Edwards River, big and little 
Pope creeks, and arrived safe, but on account of 
high water we could not return with any load until 
the water fell. We were weather bound for thirteen 
days. In the time I exchanged one span of horses 




DUGAN'S MILEAGE MART 

We Give S & H Green Stamps. 

ELDON ORLOWSKI PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 

OWNER TELEPHONE 3891 





BROWN'S MARKET 



FULL LINE OF GROCERIES 
MEAT by CUT and QUARTER 

PHONE 3821 



for such things as I wanted. In the meantime there 
were ten men with teams on the same errand as 

ourselves joined in, which was very acceptable. 
We loaded up and started, quite a respectable car- 
avan. 

"It was 18 miles to the first house or cabin. Wc 
crossed the two creeks in safety without any dif- 
ficulty, altho the weather was excessive cold. Ed- 
wards River had fallen in consequence of the 
freeze that we thought we could ford it. The banks 
were so steep and frozen that one pair of horses 
could not hold one load down nor draw it up on the 
other side, so we coupled six yoke together and 
made fast to the hind ox with sufficient length of 
chain, and they eased the load down into the 
stream. Then we took the cattle across and they 
drew it up the other bank. In this way we succeed- 
ed in getting all over safe, except my load. 

"In raising to the bank about half way up, the 
cattle broke the chain and my wagon ran back 
and upset my load into the river. We soon righted 
up the wagon and I put into the river and collected 
my load, (which was principally m barrels). I of- 
fered a good price for help but they refused and ad- 
vised me to let it go downstream, that I should get 
my death by such exposure, but I could not spare 
the articles. 1 floated them to shore and put a chain 
around them and ran a pole through. Those on the 
shore with my help in the rear pulled them up the 
bank and we loaded up again and went on. It was 
three and a half hours from the time I went into 
the water before I reached a fire, and what is 
somewhat remarkable I did not freeze in any part, 
and everyone that was on the bank was frozen, 
some badly, but we succeeded in getting along fin- 
ally, but had often to put all teams forward on one 
wagon. 

"Came to Green River we had to unload and 
take our stuff over in a trough or canoe, swim our 
teams and fasten a rope to our wagons and pull 
them over as a seine is hauled. Then we had good 
going on the prairies, the sloughs all frozen solid. 
Arrived home well and hearty, having been about 
twenty-one days going seventy-five miles and 
back. Found at our cabin thirteen out of nineteen 
down with the measles: no doctor within thirty 
miles. All lived and got smart soon. 

"Troubles do not come single. In a day or two I 
broke my wagon tire and had to take it to Naper- 
ville 100 miles to be mended and get my horses 
shod, it being the nearest shop I could get to with- 



out swimming. It happened well enough for I got a 
good price for bringing a load from Chicago. 

"Heavy immigration that winter and spring of 
1836; provisions scarce and high; flour sixteen and 
a half dollars a barrel; pork eighteen and three- 
quarter cents per pound 




Mrs. N. G. Reynolds 

". . . . I have said provisions were high, but as 
soon as I began to have a surplus everything was 
on the decline, but I kept breaking and improving 
for five years until I had 130 acres under cultiva- 
tion and considerable stock. In 1843 I fattened and 
-took 100 hogs to Galena market (if it could be 
called so) when the following dialog commenced 
by about twenty Irishmen, 'ha mi, stranger, what do 
you ask for that pork,' '1.75' said 1, 'Oh, mun, I 
saw as fine pork as you ever pit yer eye upon sold 
last Saturday tor six bits, but that looks fine I give 
you one dollar a hundred and take the lot. What 
say you now.' 'I don't say anything.' 'What say 
you now — I give you a dollar and not another 
happenth.' Just at that time a dog lit upon one hog 
and commenced eating one of the hams. '1 say 
stranger that dog is eating your pork.' 'Let him eat,' 
I said, 'a man could not be a christian that would 
drive a dog away from pork that was worth only 
a dollar a hundred.' In a short time I effected a 
sale at 1.50 for light and 1.75 for heavy. That was a 
small price after drawing it 60 miles. It is different 
now. We have two railroads within twenty miles 
and produce bears a good price, and I am satisfied 
that patience and perserverance will drive a toad 
to Jerusalem. . . ." 



CONGRATULATIONS 




FROM ONE OLD TIMER 




TO ANOTHER 




SMITH TRUST AND 


Dredging 


SAVINGS BANK 


Excavating 


SINCE 1878 


Bulldozing 


MORRISON, ILLINOIS 




MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT 


Phil Swanson 


INSURANCE CORP. 




Pierceson Motor Ss 


lies 


Sunday Worship 10:00 

PROPHETSTOWN 




A U 


T H b R ik 


i ft 


'i 


[FDB^ 


[^ 


1 


jisAuis 


n 






^i^% //■ 




ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH 




BS^jI 




Rev. Wilfred O. Gardner - Pastor 

206 Elm St. 
Founded in 1948 




D E A^LJE R 


FC 

Ser 


DRD CARS & TRUCK! 

ving The American Motor' 


> 

St 


The Past 56 Years 




MERCURY AUTOMOBILES 

Serving The American Motorist 


We Believe in Solvation Through Christ, 
who is coming again to establish his 


The Past 20 Years 


kingdom on an earth made new. 


PIERCESON MOTOR SALES 

Serving The Prophetstown Community 


Ours is an open communion to all who believe. 


The Past 1 1 Years 


1 



From Incorporation in 1859 
To Organized Government 

The perspective changes. The Indians have left 
Thunderbolt and a thriving community has re 
placed Wa bo-f(ie-shiek's primitive village. The 
need jor schools, streets and local rules of human 
conduct now requires a central authority. 



An act to incorporate the village of Prophets- 
town was passed by the 111. State Legislature on 
Feb. 22, 1859. The town council met on Monday 
evening, April 18, 1859, in the office of A. J. Matt- 
son. Councilmen present were Mattson, A. J. TuUer, 
A. G. Porter, John H. Warner, E. S. Dickinson, Elias 
C. Hutchinson and Wm. G. Minchen. 

All councilmen served without pay except the 
clerk who received one dollar for each license or 
other instrument that would produce a revenue for 
the corporation. When the organization of the 
board was completed, Ordinances 1 to and includ- 
ing 10 were read and adopted. Cyrus Emery ap- 
peared before the board to vacate an alley. A. J. 
Mattson paid the first money the village received, 
SIO for the vacating of an alley. The clerk was in- 




structed to issue a list of road laborers (pole tax) 
vvithin the corporation. 

On Friday evening, March 23, 1860, the council 
met and totaled the first year's finances of the corp- 
oration of Prophetstown. Corporation Treas., A. J. 
Mattson, reported money received $100.75; paid out 
$70 and balance on hand $40.75. The street com- 
missioner reported expenses as $115.24; received 
from county treasurer $70, leaving an unpaid bal- 
ance of $45.24. 

On March 31, 1862, the council moved to buy 
land between the graveyard and the Dixon Road, 
now 3rd St., for $50 per acre, the land to be used 
for a cemetery. (The cemetery has been expanded 
since as necessity required with permanent sur- 
foced drives and beautiful landscaping throughout. 




1 



The Village Council in 1912 




WHITESIDE SERVICE CO. 



Plant Foods - Petroleum Products 



CLARENCE HUNT 

SALESMAN 




TRADE-MARK 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TAMPICO NATIONAL BANK 

TAMPICO, ILLINOIS 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

OFFICERS 

R. B. Adams, Chairman of the Board 

Richard B. Kelly, President 

Roy F. Nelson, Vice President 

Dale Kelly, Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

R. B. Adams 
Martin Barrett 
Richard J. Harms 
Peter C. Johnson 
Richard B. Kelly 
Roy F. Nelson 
Harold C. Plautz 




ORSI ''" CARDOSI 



FOUNTAIN SERVICE, LUNCHEONS 
NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES 



APPAREL SHOPPE 



NELLIE WETZEL 



Dresses, Sport Wear, Girdles, 
Bras, Blouses, Millinery 



r~ 






• i' 




\. 


.^'^ 


> f f 


1 ■ ■ . 


;^<^3 • 


fe^' 
















Scene of East Third Street in Late 1800's. 



While it was incorporated only in 1917, beauty has 
been its motive since its inception.) 

People had the human trait of procrastmation 
even in early days as was shown by the delinquent 
pole tax list as follows: A. J. Matttson, 2 days; A. 
Anderson, 1 day; John C. Paddock, 2 days. 

On May 3, 1863, the council made extensive 
preparations to combat small pox, urging everyone 
to be vaccinated and prepared an isolated rest 
house and employed nurses. 

It was on June 4, 1866, that the council granted 
the first recorded license to sell ardent spirits. With- 
in the first 20 years of the corporation, the saloon 
licenses were raised from $25 to $150. 

Notice of a village election in April, 1867, was 
the first election notice of its kind to appear in a 
riewspaper here. 

The Prophetstown Spike, predecessor of the 
Prophetstown Echo, was first published on Sept. 
2, 1871- by Charles Bent and A. D. Hill. 

The people of Prophetstown were quite con- 
cerned during the early years over the battle of 
holding the river from cutting the high bank along 
Ih'^ corporation boimds. 

Nov. 14, 1870, the council acted to widen Bent- 
on Si. Road south from Washington St., preparing 
lor the new depot of the Illinois Grand Trunk Rail- 
road. 




Alired Petty 's Clothing Store 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO 

PROPHETSTOWN 

ON 100 YEARS OF 
PROGRESS ! ! 

GOODENOUGH'S 
DAIRY 

GRADE "A" 
DAIRY PRODUCTS - ICE CREAM 

For Home Delivery 
PHONE 5013 OR 6235 




PROPHETSTOWN SPEED WASH 

SELF SERVICE - COIN OPERATED 
WASHERS and DRYERS 

Open 7 Days A Week 
349 WASHINGTON STREET 



HARRY RISK CO. 



LYNDON, ILLINOIS 



YOUR JOHN DEERE DEALER 



20 Years of Service to 



This Community. 



to our neighbors in 



upon the celebration of your centennial. 
May your fine city continue to prosper in 
the years to come. 



ofki 



entrai 

rtf ATI©I¥ AL B ANI 

OF STERLII\G 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




An Early Store Front 

li-i 1871, a sidewalk was built to the depot, 
three-planks wide. 

The street commissioner's salary was raised in 
1871 to SI. 50 per day. 

On Dec. 30, 1872, the council ordered purchases 
of fire fighting equipment: 2 24-ft. ladders with 
siil?s 6" at base and 4" at top; 2 16-ft. ladders with 
stiles 6" to 4"; 2 12-ft. ladders with stiles 4" to 3" 
and 2 doz. of the best 3-hooped pails to be bought. 
It was resolved to sink a well for fire protection in 
the center of the square of Washington St. and 3rd 
St. The well, pump and fixtures were largely fin- 
anced by public subscription. 




The Annis House 

In 1874, the council ordered built a lockup or 
calaboose, 12 x 14 ft., 8 ft. high on stone foundation 
and 3hingl3d roof at a cost of $200. 

A special night watchman was hired in 1877 
during the four day horse fair. He received SI. 50 
per night. 

Two of the outstanding buildings and the pride 
oi the town at this time were Baldwins store at 218 
Washington St., and the First Nat'l Bank at 112 E. 
3rd St. 



The first industries of the town v/ere for the 
purpose of processing community products. A 
creamery was established at 638 E. 3rd St., for mak- 
ing butter and cheese. As the local stockmen were 
then, as now, great hog raisers, favoring the Jersey 
Red, the processing of pork was a thriving indus- 
try. Job Dodge, a merchant with a store at 106 W. 
Srd St., also had a pork processing plant and 
bouled dressed hogs to Savannah and Albany, 
where they were sent by river to St. Louis. He re- 
ceived from 75 cents to $1.50 per 100 lbs. of dressed 
I o^k. His business grossed $25,000 a year. 




William McNeill's Creamery of 1881. 

In 1854, Horace Annis, Thomas Bryant and the 
Warner brothers erected a large brick building on 
W. 3rd. St., on rhe ground now occupied by the 
new Lutheran Church, as a plow and wagon fac- 
tory. The Warner brothers later became sole own- 
ers and added a steam saw mill and had an ex- 
tensive business for a while, but discontinued it in 
1869. These brothers also had a processing plant 
for pork and one for poultry. They would hove in 
their yard, now 315 W. 2nd St., 3,000 geese at a time. 
The yard was on the hillside and during an ice 
storm they put a touch of tar on the feet of the geese 
so that they could walk on the ice. The geese, it was 
claimed, ate a wagon load of com a day. The pork 
plant was at the location currently known as 106 
'-rnd 108 Riverside Drive. 

The McDonald Mfg. Co., owned by Dr. Tascher, 
made patterns for the casting of gray iron floor 
r'aL33. W. I. Schryver manufactured breaking carts, 
end, along with others, had an extensive business 
oi buggy painting. 




The Rock River House 



81 St Year of Publication 



THE MOLINE 
DAILY DISPATCH 







MABEL HARMS 

Dispatch Prophetstown 
Office Manager 



Serving five Western Illinois counties, where it contributes to enjoyable family 
living. The Dispatch offers a comfortable blend of international, national, state 
and local news. The Dispatch is at home in the city, village and on the farm. 
The Dispatch, leader in community service, is honored to participate in the 100th 
anniversary of Prophetstown— The Centennial City. 

Circulation Leader in Western Illinois 




Complete Line of 

Hardware 

Housewares 

Paints & 

Rural Supplies 




Maytag 

& 

G.E. 

Appliances 



31 7 WASHINGTON ST. 



PHONE 2881 - PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 



The Telephone Company 



The first telephone hnes of this community were 
built by fanners to furnish neighborhood party 
line telephone service. Each neighborhood built 
its own line and had several telephones con- 
nected on the line, but no switchboard or central of- 
fice connection. The first of these lines was built on 
what is known as the Washington Street Road. Af- 
ter several of these lines were built, it was decided 
that a switchboard should be installed. This was 
done and the subscribers were to pay an annual 
switching fee of two dollars and fifty cents. 

More and more people were acquiring tele- 
phone service. On February 18, 1903, a charter 
was issued to form a corporation to be named The 
Whiteside County Mutual Telephone Company. It 
was to furnish telephone service for Morrison, Lyn- 
don, Prophetstown and the rural communities ad- 
jacent to these towns. 

At a meeting held on October 21, 1905, in the 
town hall at Prophetstown, an agreement was made 
to divide the territory of the Whiteside County Mu- 
tual Telephone Company. Prophetstown was to 
have all the territory south of Rock River and also 
the two farms at the north end of the Rock River 
Bridge. Following this division, an application was 
made by The Prophetstown Mutual Telephone 
Company for a corporate charter. This was granted. 
At the time of this meeting, two hundred and forty 
telephones had been installed and toll connections 
had been established with The Central Union Tele- 
phone Company of Sterling and trunk lines had 
been connected with Morrison, Tampico, Erie and 
Hooppole. 

During the year 1914, a new switchboard was 
purchased and installed in a second floor apart- 
ment at 334I/2 South Washington Street. The new 
equipment had a capacity of ona hundred and 
sixty lines. 

At the annual stockholders meeting of De- 
cember 14, 1915, it was voted to maintain twenty- 
four hour service. Prior to this time the exchange 
had been operated six a.m. to nine p.m. daily and 
on Sundays eight to ten a.m. and two to four p.m. 
except for emergency calls. 

In 1918, The Interstate Telephone Company, 
which had also operated a telephone exchange in 
this community, sold its plant and equipment to 
The Morrison Telephone Company and the local 
service of this company was discontinued. The toll 
lines to Sterling and Morrison were taken ovsr by 
the Morrison Company and connected to the Pro- 
phetstown switchboard. 

In 1919, a new three position switchboard with 
a capacity of three hundred lines was purchased 
and installed by the Prophetstown company. The 



number of telephone users at this time was six 
hundred and sixty-five. 

On Febraury 28, 1928, the company entered 
into an agreement for the erection of a new ex- 
change building and to lease the same for a period 
of twenty years. The building was erected at 108 
East Railroad Street and the equipment was moved 
into the new building May 6, 1928, and connected 
to a new underground cable system. At this time 
there was a total of seven hundred thirty-six sta- 
tions. 

During the year 1952, a twenty year loon was 
secured to finance changing the service from mag- 
neto and common battery to an automatic dial tele- 
phone exchange. An addition to the exchange 
building was made and leased from the ov/ner to 
provide space for the new equipment. At present, 
it is a dial operated exchange with one thousand, 
three hundred and seventy stations. 

In 1956, the Hooppole telephone exchange was 
purchased and added to the Prophetstown ex- 
change. The Hooppole exchange has been com- 
pletely rebuilt and converted to dial service. A fire- 
proof building- was built to house the nev/ equip- 
ment. This change has added about one hundred 
and eighty telephones. 

At present there are eight toll lines to Sterling, 
two to Morrison, one to Tampico, one to Erie and 
two trunk lines to Hooppole. 




Number Please? — Mary Warner, Pearl Needham 



SERMNG PROPHETSTOWN 

SINCE 1896 



J. E. FRARY 

1896-1905 

J. E. FRARY & SON 
J. E. FRARY CLAUDE E. FRARY 

1905-1917 

FRARY & FRARY 
BRACE M. FRARY CLAUDE E. FRARY 

1917-1947 

FRARY & SONS 

1947- ??? 




C. Deane Frary 



Brace M. Frary 



FENCING — PAINTS 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

GRAIN — COAL 

FEED SEED 

PHONE 4051 



Don E. Frary 



FARM SUPPLIES 



FERTILIZER 



Horse Thieves Dectective Club 



Prevalent crime of the early days was that of 
stealing horses. Many communities have tales 
handed down through the years about a person or 
two who was involved in such activities directly or 
otherwise. 

It has been said that there lived nearby a man 
who had established a hide-out for the horse 
thieves. It seemed that on his farm there was a 
bam built into a bank, providing not only room for 
horses, but their riders as well. This particular 
farm was obvious to the thieves because of the thir- 
teen white gates which had significance to those 
fhusly employed. 

A tunnel connected the house and barn so tho: 
communications and food could be taken to the 
thieves without notice. 

On most occasions the thieves rode at night 
and hid during the daytime. When accomodations, 
such as the one mentioned, were not available, 
they chose to hide in the canebrake along the riv- 
ers and sloughs. However, within a night's ride 
from this local hide-out the thieves could find anoth- 
er marked farm where they would be welcomed by 
a host whom they, no doubt, paid well. 

Since horse thieves became quite a threat to 
the settlers, the Prophtstown Horse Thief Detective 
Club was organized in 1865. The original consitu- 
tion and by-laws are copied as follows; 

Organization of the 

Prophetstown Horse Thief Detective Club 

A. D. 1865 

We the undersigned for the purpose of protecting 
ourselves against horse thieves propose to form a 
protective union and agree to pay one dollar each 
for a life membership and also agree to subject 
ourselves to such rules and regulations and assess- 
ments as said Protection Union may prescribe. 

Constitution 

PREAMBLE: We the citizens of the Township of 
Prophetstown, County of Whiteside and State of 
Illinois, for the purpose of mutual protection against 
horse thieves agree to form ourselves into a soc- 
iety and to be governed by the following rules 
and regulations subject to amendment at any reg- 
ular meeting by a majority of the members pres- 
ent. 

Article 1: This society shall be known by the 
name of the Prophetstown Horse Thief Detective 
Club. 

Article 2: The officers of this society shall be 
one president, two vice-pres., one secretary and one 
treasurer, they shall hold their offices one year or 
until their successors are elected. 



Article 3: It shall be the duty of the President to 
call all special meetings of this society, direct the 
riders, decide all claims against the society, give 
all orders on the treasury. 

Article 4: The Vice President shall discharge 
all duties devolving on the President in his ab- 
sence. 

Article 5: The secretary shall keep a record of 
all the proceedings of this society and report the 
same whenever called upon and post notices of all 
regular meetings at least ten days before the same. 

Atricle 6: The treasurer shall keep a correct ac- 
count of all monies received belonging to the soc- 
iety and disburse upon the orders of the president 
and report at regular meetings. 

Article 7: Any person may become a member 
of this society by signing this consitution and pay- 
ing into the treasurer the sum of one dollar. 

Article 8: The officers of this society shall be 
elected by ballot and all other questions coming 
before the society may be decided by ballot or 
yeas and nays and the regular meetings o; this 
society shall be on the same day of th3 annual 
town meeting. 

— By Laws — 
It shall be the duty of each member of this soc- 
iety to go at the order or call of the presidsnt v/he-i 
designated whenever and wherever directed in 
pursuit of any horse stolen from any member of this 
society. 

Any member neglecting or refusing to go at 
the order or call of the president without a good 
and sufficient cause shall forfeit his mgmbership to 
this society. The first days riding shall be free and 
for each day thereafter necessarily employed a 
fee of one dollar and fifty cents and reasonable 
expenses shall be paid out of the treasury of said 
society. When any member of this society being in 
pursuit shall secure any horse thief and delive- 
him to the proper authorities he shall be entitled 
to receive from this society a reward of ten dolla'? 
besides all other rewards offered by other parties. 
Whenever it shall come to the knowledge of any 
member that horse has been stolen it shall be the 
duty of said member to report the fact immediate- 
ly to the president and as far as practicable to 
other members. 

A membership of five days will be required 
of any person joining this society, after the expir- 
ation of one month from the adoption of this con- 
sitution before he can receive the aid of this soc- 
iety. 

Any member receiving aid from this society to 
hunt horses other than stolen ones shall pay all 
expenses. 



•*v-. 



YOUR 

I-H DEALER 

BENTERS AND ALLEN 




Congratulates Prophetstown 

Pictured below are Customers who Purchased 
Machines and Tractors on The Early Traders Bonus. 




See The All New I. H. Tractors 

AND 

New (Years Ahead) Farm Machines 

AT 

BENTERS and ALLEN 



GENUINE PARTS AND SERVICE 



PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 



PHONE 2501 



This ad sponsored by Benters and Allen & 
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER — Broadview, III. 



Any member suspected of fraud or treachery 
to this society may be expelled by a vote of two- 
thirds of the members present at any regular or 
special meeting. 

All members shall be liable and shall pay 
equal assessments for fees, rewards and for nec- 
cessary and incidental expenses in maintaining 
this society. 

List of members of the Prophetstown Horse 
Thief Detective Club Viz: Cyrus Emery, N. Thomp- 
son, O. Willcox, E. S. Ellifhorpe, Geo. Paddock, Wm 
Hill, Geo. P. Richmond, Dan Van Antwerp, R. J 
Dickinson, Ed Reynolds, Orrin Paddock, Jacob Win- 
chell, Wm. Lane, H. S. Hull, S, G. Baldwin, J. H 
Mosher, Ed Paddock, Chas. Lancaster, W. E. Brig 
ham, Horatis Greene, E. S. Bently, Edw. Lancas 
ter, H. A. Sturtevant, Wm. Booth, Isaac Francis 
Geo. W. Potter, John Aylesworth, C. W. Cabot, Na 
than E. Gage, Myron Howland, Daniel Leahy, M. V 



Seeley, D. W. Paddock, Chas. McCarter, D. K. 
Smith, J. W. Hill, J. H. Warner, A. D. Adams, J. E. 
Loomis, Thos. Drain, R. C. Crook, J. A. Jamison, 
A. E. Loomis, John Lewis, Fred Hutchinson. 

At their regular meeting April 7, 1896, a mo- 
tion was made and carried that the Secretary and 
Treasurer be instructed to take the necessary steps 
and organize under the State low Chapter 32 Sec- 
tion 92. 

Nathan Thompson Pres. 
Geo. P. Richmond 
M. V. Seely 
Vice Pres. 
H. S. Hull Treas. 
S. G. Baldwin Secy. 

It has been reported that during its existence, 
the Horse Thief Detective Club recovered one stolen 
horse. 



The Li^ht Company 



In 1896 William McNeill started an electric 
hght plant here. Hall Green of Morrison installed 
it for a contract price of $10,000. The DC current 
was generated by steam power, which ran from 12 
noon to 12 midnight. The plant was housed in a 
frame building covered with iron located in the cen- 
ter of the 200 block on West Railroad St. 

Electric meters were not used at first. Everyone 
paid a flat rote per month. 

Mr. McNeill sold his light plant to Roy Olm- 
stead and Charles Lancaster in 1900. A fireman 
for the steam-powered plant and the two partners 
were the utility crew, doing all the wiring, line 



work, etc. They used as a conveyance a light wag- 
on drawn by one horse. After a year Lancaster sold 
his interest in the plant to Joy Sholes. Two years 
later Mr. Olmstead became the sole owner. A new 
building was erected for this plant. Not wishing to 
interrupt operations of the plant, the new building 
was constructed completely around the old one 
which they later razed and carried out piece by 
piece. Mr. Olmstead operated the plant until 1912, 
when he sold it to the Illinois Northern Utility Co., 
a subsidiary of Commonwealth Edison Co. A high 
voltage line from Sterling was erected in 1913. The 
system has been converted from direct to alternat- 
ing current. 



Driving Park Association 



The Prophetstown Driving Park Ass'n was or- 
ganized in 1875. It was a tract of around 20 acres 
lying west and adjoining Washington Street along 
the 900 block. A half-mile race track was laid out 
and properly finished with all necessary buildings. 
This was considered a very fast track, due to the 
texture of the soil which was of a cushion nature 
rather than the hard packed clay in most tracks. 
Sherman Baldwin was one of the more prominent 
mentioned starters. 

Some of the outstanding local horses and 'own- 
ers were Gregory Boy, David Adams; Lula Mc- 
Curdy, George P. Richmond; Judge Crabtree, Sher- 
man Baldwin; Molock, J. H. Mosher; Harry B., Jack 
Bracken; Bum, Swan Swanson; Billie Wonder, Jim 
Middleton, and Pete Johnson, Ort Chamberlain. 



Gregory Boy was killed racing in Iowa. A grey 
mare owned by Adams established a record on 
the Galesburg, 111., track by being the first to circle 
the half-mile track in one minute. While Richmond 
owned Lula McCurdy, she was considered the 
greatest racer in these parts. 

Richmond was a breeder of fine horse; and 
often had 50 head at one time. There was an ex- 
cellent training track on the Richmond farm east o' 
town on Jackson St. Road, now State Route 172, 
where horses were put in shape for the local race 
track. If these horses did not prove fast enough, 
they would be sold for private driving horses. 

So far as is known the driving park was dis- 
continued soon after the turn of the centurv. 



YOUR 
STORY AND CLARK PIANO 

and 

KINSMAN ELECTRONIC ORGAN DEALER 

SINCE 1923 
Enjoy Life More — With Music 

SOMMERS SONG SHOP 



YOUR 
RCA VICTOR DEALER 

SINCE 1923 

SEE THE DIFFERENCE 

RCA VICTOR COLOR T.V. 
MAKES 

SALES AND SERVICE 

SOMMERS SONG SHOP 



The Old Supervisor's Bridge 



On December 16, 1891, at the regular meet- 
ing of the board of supervisors of Whiteside Coun- 
ty, Mssrs. Nevitt, Potter and Hall were appointed 
as a Prophetstown bridge committee to survey the 
prospective highway bridge site over Rock River 
and advertise for bids. 

The contract for the new bridge was let on 
October 13, 1892, to the Detroit Bridge and Iron 
Works on the site which is approximately the same 
location as the present bridge on State Route 78. 



The price was to be $25,979.00 and the cost was to 
be born equally between Prophetstown Township 
and Whiteside County. 

The huge stones for the piers and abutments 
were shipped in by freight and cut and dressed on 
the ground where the west end of the Eclipse Plant 
No. 1 borders Washington St. at Railroad St. Both 
the piers and the super structure of the bridge were 
hauled to the bridge site by teams. This bridge was 
replaced by the present one in 1934. 



Supervisors Bid for National Capitol 



The supervisor represented the township in 
county government. Serving in that capacity were: 
Obadiah W. Gage 1852-8; Mark AveriU 1859; H. S. 
Cabot 1860-75; Mark Averill 1862; Andrew J. TuUer 
1863-68; Leander Lewis 1869-75, and Phinas B. Rey- 
nolds 1876-77. 

A resolution was offered at the Dec. 1869 ses- 
sion of supervisors, duly acted upon and adopted. 



offering the county; "because of the Mississippi 
River, a great avenue of travel and commerce, form- 
ing our western boundary; the great east and west 
highway and great central rail route from east to 
west transversing the country", as a national cap- 
ital in lieu of Washington, D. C. So had this offer 
been accepted, Prophetstown could have been just 
a street address on, say, Pennsylvania Avenue. 



COiiGRATULATlONS '° PROPHETSTOWN 


Oh 


J YOUR 


100'" 


BIRTHDAY 


JOHN 


HILLER 


D-X BULK PRODUCTS 




PLAUTZ GARAGE 

LEONARD PLAUTZ 
PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 



24 Hour Towing Service 



PHONE HOOPPOLE DAY 
82485 


NIGHT 
82633 




24 Hour Truck Stop 
Dial HOoppole 8-2484 


Junction Rts. 
78 and 92 



PROPHETSTOWN 

FARMERS MUTUAL 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Organized 1876 
AGENTS for ROCKFORD TORNADO INS. CO. 

Reliable Service Prompt Adjustment 

F. J. HOWLAND, President 

HOWARD MARTIN, Vice-President 

CHAS. O. CLEAVELAND, Secretary 

CARL O. SWANSON, Treasurer 




FRITZ'S D-X SERVICE 

LUNCH ROOM IN CONNECTION 



BELL'S GROCERY 

314 WASHINGTON ST. 

Fresh Fruits & Vegetables 

Complete Line of Top Quality Groceries 

Fresh and Cold Cut Meat 

- PLUS - 

S & H Green Stamps 

PHONE 4111 

LES & LAURA LOU BELL 

OWNERS 



From Hand Toil to 
Mechanized Farming 



Summer breezes no longer fan U'dd prairie grass- 
es, but even rows of corn. The rhythmical effic- 
iency of the farm machinery his replaced the 
sounds of community groups rvcrking at hai-vest. 
But the hazards of searing drought, flood and 
pestilence continue to challenge the bold and 
strong and defeat the timid and indolent. 



Prophetstown lies in the heart of a very rich ag- 
ricultural district. The land is extremely fertile, and 
many thrifty farmers have grown financially inde- 
pendent. In the early 1900's it was probably the 
only rural section where the soil tillers had auto- 
mobiles. It is said that in town and country 
around there were nearly twenty of those destruc- 
tive machines. The face of the land was beautiful, 
not a dead level, but just enough swell and mea- 
dow to to create a beautiful countryside. No won- 
der Black Hawk and his braves clung to this love- 
ly valley. 

Only a few Prophetstown residents can re- 
member cutting grain with a cradle. Early settlers 
cut their grain with a cradle. It was built in the 
shape of a scythe with one blade that performed 
ihe cutting plus four or five curved, round sticks 
forming the cradle on which the grain would rest 
It swung like a scythe, and at the end of the 
stroke, the grain was deposited in a pile. Later, 
the farmer raked the piles into the size needed for 
bundles. As there was no string, the farmer tied 




the bundles with a strcrw knot. Timothy, for in- 
stance, was stacked two bundles wide and six or 
eight bundles long to permit the air to circulate 
through. 

One improvement was the Kirby Reaper. It 
featured a floor that raised and lowered to permit 
cutting different heights of grain or grass. The man 
walked along the side and raked off grain in piles 
suitable for tying. Later, the Marsh Harvester was 
employed. Two men rode the machine and tied the 
bundles with grain. Another machine used and 
seen in many Threshing Reunions was the Self- 
Rake. It had five arms that turned on the same 
principle as a reel. It raked the straw off the plat- 
form to be tied by hand. 

In the 1880's binders came out with an attach- 
ment that tied the bundle by machine. Wire was 
first used, but it was discontinued because the wire 
found its way into the cows' stomach. Mr. Weath- 
erbee invented the bill hook that is still used on to- 
day's modern automatic baler. 





tyfff" 



An Early Threshing Scene 



(YORKTOWN) 

Livestock & General Hauling 

TAMPICO, 120-R4 



I L'L- 




^ 




FAMILY PRIDE 
( FOODS ^ 

I TAMPICO. ILLINOIS j 



WELCOME 

TO PROPHETSTOWN CENTENNIAL 




DORATHrS FLOOR COVERINGS 

Phone 3581 



SAVE ROYAL BLUE BUCKS. 

Good For Valuable Premiums. 



MONARCH AND JACK SPRAT 
FINER FOODS 



SELF-SERVICE MEATS • 

COUNTRY FRESH PRODUCE 




Phone 2011 



T% 'ftWi^ij!^-'' 





Ola Adams Single-Hondedly Pulls Mower Through Mallory Hill's Field — Settles $10 Wager in 1897. 



Horses were the source of power for all of the 
farm machines. Indeed, many farmers built up their 
standing in the community by their ability to buy, 
trade and breed horses. A good horse sold foi 
about $100. In the spring, until the coming of trao' 
tors, new colts were broken. Most machines used 
a three-horse hitch. Many of today's farmers can 
recall the stud horse being led behind a buggy 
through the countryside. Breeding fees were $10 ta 
$15. 

Horse thieves were a problem in this area. 
There was a society established to track down the 
culprits. Charles Emery's grandfather was presi- 
dent in the early days. 

Years ago there were no veterinarians. Farm- 
ers had their own or the neighbor's cure for sick- 
ness. A dose of medicine called 'Nighter' was giv- 
en for kidney trouble. About 1880 the closest vet 
lived in Geneseo. 

The same crops known on today's farms were 
grown in the early days — com, oats, timothy and 
clover. There were no experimental stations or 
commercial companies to supply the farmer with 
seed or information. If a farmer wanted new seed, 
he exchanged with his neighbor. 

Farms were generally smaller in acreage than 
now. For one man, eighty acres was an average- 
size farm. He had, on an average, six cows, a few 
chickens and 12-20 hogs. One farmer in the com- 
munity raised about sixty head of hogs a year. He 
was 'he object of much curiosity as farmers would 
drive miles to see his huge amount of hogs. Hogs 
were sold alive to Chicago Stock Yards. They were 
kept at least a year to fatten up for sale. Hogs 
weighed at least three hundred pounds before ship- 
ping, and sometimes they weighed as much as 
six-hundred pounds. They were fattened on skim 
milk and com. Cattle buyers toured the country 

Sauk Valley 
L R. 



and bought cattle. When sold, they were driven 
down the road to the market place. 

As there was no tile, there was much wet land. 
Hunting ducks was a popular pastime. Ducks were 
sometimes so thick they raised up like a cloud! 

Fences were a problem on early farms. Boards 
and oak rails were used because there was no 
fencing wire or barbed wire. A popular fence was 
the willow fence. A green willow stick pushed into 
the ground would take root and grow anywhere. 
A willow tree would stool out so thickly that live- 
stock could not go through. Later smooth wire was 
used around the buildings. Some farmers experi- 
mented with fastening short pieces of wire onto the 
smooth wire with the points sharpened. This was 
the fore-runner of today's barbed wire. 

When a man starts farming today, he needs 
lots of credit, a bank account, a full hne of ma- 
chinery, livestock to fill his sheds, plus a wife and 
a set of furniture. In the IBOO's, he needed a hus- 
ky wife, a team of horses, a one-row com plow, a 
two-section drag, a mowing machine, a fourteen 
inch walking plow, a wagon and a buggy. If a man 
were very capable, he could hire out for as much 
as $20 a month. Land sold for about $40 an acre. 

Prices at the D. M. Crawford store in Sterling 
in June, 1862, were quite different than those of to- 
day. Common shoes sold for $1.15 a pair, and 
cheaper shoes were fifty cents a pair. Cotton flan- 
nel was quite expensive, at thirty cents a yard. 
Denim sold for twenty-two cents a yard and mus- 
lin at fourteen cents a yard. If you needed a pair 
of inexpensive gloves, you paid nine cents a pair. 
Coffee sold for twenty five cents a pound. Com sold 
at ten cents a bushel, and it was so cheap it was 
sometimes burned for fuel. When you took your 
butter, eggs and lard to town to sell, you received 



College 
C 101805 





WAYNE WHEELOCK 


ANNIVERSARY 




"GREETINGS" 


CUSTOM 




SHELLING AND SPREADING 


HERALD'S DRUG STORE 






LIME AND FERTILIZER 




PHONE 2821 PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 


CONGRATULATIONS 




^^I^Hj^^HPWi^^ ^^-^^ 


TO 

PROPHETSTOWN 






ON YOUR 




f^' ^gmm 


1 00th BIRTHDAY 


"^P 




MODERN BEAUTY SHOP 




GLADYS UNDER 


FLO'S BEAUTY SALON 


Proprietor 




216 WASH ST. 


112 4th AVE. 


PHONE 2631 


STERLING, ILLINOIS 


PROFESSIONAL CARE 
IS BEST FOR THE HAIR 



eight cents for thirty pounds of butter, four cents a 
dozen for eggs and seven cents a pound for lard. 
Town was usually as much a twenty-fivo or thirty 
miles away. 

Compare that with today's prices! The farmer 
of long ago also did without electricity, hydraulic 
systems, milking machines, silage unloaders, com- 
bines, balers and many other things we think com- 
monplace. As there was no refrigeration, milk was 
skimmsd two times a day and kept in the cellai 
to cool. Later, cool water from the pump was used. 

Home butchering and canning was done on all 



[arms. Butcher wagons toured the country, and the 
people could buy their meat supplies from them. 
Telephones came in the early 1900's and electric- 
ity in the 1930's. 

Despite the work, the farm people loved to 
square dance on Saturday nights. There was a 
dance hall in Spring Hill and in Yorktown where 
the Motor Inn is now located. Many dances were 
held in the farm home. Orchestras were composed 
of two or three violins and a bass viol. A caller 
was always in demand, and if he were well- 
versed, he made the evening interesting for every- 
one. 





The Hilaire Castelein Modern Farm Near Prophetstown 




i 




CONGRATULATIONS 

PROPHETSTOWN 



GEAR INC. 

"YOUR NEWEST INDUSTRY" 



The Coming of the Iron Horse 



In Eighteen hundred seventv one, the view from 
the Mountain rvas clouded fcp puffs of smoke 
from the first iron horse. But this advancement 
in transportation n>as not accomplished rvithoui 
heartbreak and sacrifice. 




It was a natural hope and ambition of the peo- 
ple of Prophetstown to have rail facilities. Like 
many other communities this town was the victim 
of dreamers, promoters and downright swindlers. 

The building of the present railroad through 
Prophetstown was marked by nearly 20 years of 
struggle to secure the right of way and sufficient 
finances. Many individuals lost great sums of 
money before any trains were put into operation. 

The Comanche, Albany and Mendota Railroad 
Company was incorporated under the General Law 
of Illinois, by Articles dated July 31, 1856, and filed 
with the Secretary of State on September 11,1 856. 



On July 31, 1856, the company was organized 
at Albany, Illinois, by the election of officers. The 
route was to extend from Mendota, in LaSalle Coun- 
ty, Illinois, to Albany, in Whiteside County, Illinois. 
The railroad was planned to service LaSalle, Bu- 
reau, Lee and Whiteside counties. 

A large subscription to the stock of the comp- 
any was obtained along the line. Nearly all prop- 
erty owners subscribed, thinking it a sound invest- 
ment. 

This company did no construction work, but 
acquired most of the right of way. On June 1, 1859, 
ii then consolidated with the Joliet, Terre Haute 
Railroad Company (which was incorporated in 




The First Depot 



MEIER'S SUPER MARKET 

"Where Price Tells and Quality Sells" 

Complete Line of 
GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 

308 WASHINGTON ST. 

DAILY DELIVERY 10 A.M. 

PHONE 3601 




Prophetstown TV Service 



RADIO AND TV SERVICE 



DONALD B. SCOTT, owner 



2011 
4124 



106 W. RAILROAD ST. 
PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 






EVERETTE W. BROWN 



MASONRY WORK 



PROPHETSTOWN 



6352 




R. 0. "BOB" SIEFKEN 



Standard Oil Products 



TELEPHONE 3841 




Train Wreck Near the Depot 

1852) and took the name of Illinois Grand Trunk 
Railway Company. The new company was organ- 
ized on June 1, 1859, at Mendofa, Illinois, by the 
election of officers. 

There is nothing on record to show what the 
new company accomplished, but probably some 
grading was done on the line from Mendota to Al- 
bany and more right of way acquired. 

More money was needed and the same prop- 
erty owners subscribed additional funds. Many 
people mortgaged their homes to do it. In addition 
to having the much needed rail facilities, they had 
hopes that the railroad would greatly increase the 
value of their property and give a large return on 
their investments. About $270,000 was subscribed 
in all by the people along the line. The contract 
was let and the contractors took their pay in mort- 
gage bonds. Work was begun and a great portion 
of it was finished by the end of 1859. The bonds 
came due and the majority of them were not paid. 
Work was suspended and law suits were begun to 
force collection. The subscribers became indig- 
nant and irate, for they had mortgaged their homes 
and had nothing in return. 

During a long period of legal difficulties a ser- 
ies of transactions took place wherein the railroad 
property changed ownership several times. 

From a connection with the Chicago, Burling- 
ton and Ouincy Railroad near Mendota, Illinois, 
the newly organized Illinois Grand Trunk Railway 
was to go westerly to Prophetstown, Illinois. Then 
from Prophetstown a main line extension would go 
northwest to East Clinton, Illinois, and thence to 
Fulton, Illinois. In all the total number of miles of 
track constructed in the name of the Illinois Trunk 
Railway was 64.38. There were never any branch 
lines constructed. 

A. J. Mattson of Prophetstown was instrumental 
in encouraging towns along the line to donate more 
land for station grounds and money to further and 



hasten the project. Again in 1870, work was begun 
and the line was completed and the first train of 
:ars came into town on March 8, 1871. It was 
opened for traffic to Prophetstown on May 14, 1871. 
The first regular passenger and freight service be- 
gan early in 1872. To be sure, excitement was high 
on that great day, when the first train of cars en- 
tered the village of Prophetsown. The main line ex- 
tension from Prophetstown to East Clinton was 
completed and placed in operation July 23, 1872. 
By the year 1883 the main line extension from East 
Clinton was opened for use. 

The Illinois Grand Trunk Railway never oper- 
ated any portion of the rail it constructed or which 
was constructed in its name. On October 1, 1870, 
the above named company leased for 99 years, all 
of its railroad built and to be built, to the Chicago, 
Burlington and Ouincy R. R. Company which op- 
erated it from the date of completion until June 
1, 1899, at which time it purchased the line. To the 
present day it owns and operates the road. 

In 1920 there were four regular passenger 
trains and six regular local freights. 

The steam engines gave way to the diesels in 
the early forties. 

The original depot burned down in 1944. A 
new one was completed in 1949. In the meantime 
a 'box car" depot was used. 

The passenger service was discontinued about 
1950. To date there are two regular local freights 
as well as several through freights. 




First Raihoad Bridge — 1871 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AND BEST WISHES 

FROM YOUR 




DISTRIBUTOR 

FARMERS ELEVATOR & SUPPLY CO. 
Morrison, III. 

ASSOCIATE HATCHERY 

BOB BASS RTE. 92 HATCHERY 
Walnut, III. 

DISTRICT SUPERVISOR 

MRS. RAYMOND LYON 
Prophetstown, III. 




BUCK'S BODY SHOP 



Cushman Sales & Service 



PROPHETSTOWN TELEPHONE 5302 



Weldon Lawrence & Sons 

PROPHETSTOWN TELEPHONE 4631 

We Are Equipped To Do 
All Types Of Excavating. 

Basement Digging 
Back Filling 




CASSEI^ S HYDRAULIC EQUIP. CO. 



PHONE 160-R2 



TAMPICO, ILL. 



Inventive Genius Brings Industry 



The imp night light of an inventive genius might 
have been barely visible from Thunderbolt at the 
turn oj ihe century. But the product of Fred 
Adams' handirvork Tvas destined to alter the 
view. 



It is doubtful that Chief Wa-bo-kie-shiek, the 
Prophet, for whom Prophetstown is named and who 
was credited with ability to look into the future, 
could foresee an industry arising near the site of 
his camp on Coon Creek. 

The Eclipse Lawn Mower Co. came into being 
in early 1900 when a local resident, Fred Adams, 
developed a new type lawn mower with several 
unique features that were patented in 1902. He was 
joined shortly thereafter by his brother, Henry C. 
Adams, and the business was incorporated in 1904 
with C. W. Fenn and Dr. J. H. Mosher as directors 
in addition to the Adams brothers. The company, 
like so many small businesses, started b)r individ- 
uals with ideas and ambition, grew and flourished 
under our system of free enterprise. 




Early Interior of Eclipse 

The first Eclipse lawn mowers were built in a 
barn located on the property now owned by Mrs. 
Vinna Lament on Washington Street. As business 
increased, the mowers were made in a building 




located where the Pure Oil Station now stands. In 
1910, the first floor of Plant I was erected, and lat- 
er, the second floor and east section were added. 

In the year 1912 about 12 persons were em- 
ployed by the company. One of these was Luther 
Lindberg who retired in 1954 after having served 
the company for more than 42 years. Production at 
that time averaged approximately 60 mowers a day 
lor two days a week. 

Manufacturing space was expanded from time 
to time as the business increased, and in 1920 the 
company built its own foundry, which was dedica- 
ted by William Jennings Bryan. The first castings 
were produced in the spring of 1921. 

A woodshop building was erected in 1921, as 
at that time lawn mowers had wooden handles and 
rollers, and for the most part, shipped in wooden 
boxes. With the trend toward steel handles, the or- 
iginal woodshop has been converted into storage 
space for castings. 

Henry Adams was the principal executive of- 
ficer of the company during all of its difficult forma- 
tive years. During the period of changes from hand 
to powered mowers, and through the critical years 
of the depression the company was operated un- 
der the dynamic leadership of L. B. Roth, Adam's 
son-in-law. 

In 1937 The Eclipse Lawn Mower Co. was the 
first manufacturer to develop a power driven model 
designed and priced for home use. This was the 
popular "20" Rocket which made the name "Ec- 
lipse" famous throughout the world. 

In 1937 a modern steel and brick storage ware- 
house was erected, and because of the continued 
expansion of the buildings the manufacturing build- 
ing, known as Plant II, was started in 1941. By the 
time this building was completed. World War II in- 



■M<?i ■> 




_J»^ 



HAYNER HEATING 
& COOLING 



307 Washington Street 
I I I ^ .^J I 'lJ l j'l.m. 'T;^ Prophetstown, Illinois 

Phone 4871 - 24 hr. Service 



TROSTEL 

ENGINEERED 
PACKINGS and OIL SEALS 



Leciher 

and Synthetic 

Rubber Oil Seoli 




Leather 
Pockinjn 



ONE SOURCE for your COMPLETE REQUIREMENTS 
in RUBBER and LEATHER PACKINGS and OIL SEALS 

■ic Research and development laboratori 
ic Engineering and tooling facilities 
-A" Pilot tanning and molding plants 
■^ Modern mass production facilities 

ALBERT TROSTEL PACKINGS, LTD. 

LAKE GENEVA, WISCONSIN 



LIFE INSURANCE - SICKNESS & ACCIDENT 

PROTECTION - ANNUITIES - GROUP INSURANCE 

GROUP PENSION 



WANTED 

A CHANCE 

TO SERVE 

Y-O-U. 



RESIDENCE 
P.O. Box 92 
215 W. Railroad St. 

Prophetstown, III. 



Telephone 3631 




RICHARD JOSLIN 

District Agent 

THE 

PRUDENTIAL 

INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF 

AMERICA 





Congratulations Prophetstown 



FRANK FOTZLER 



tervened and the manufacture of lawn mowers was 
prohibited. The company then offered its services 
toward the war effort and entered into an agreement 
with Burgess-Norton Manufacturing Company In 
Geneva, Illinois, to supply tank track links for the 
ordnance department to be produced in the new 
building. The manufacture of war material con- 
tinued from June, 1942, until July, 1945,, and during 
this period some $4,000,000 worth of links were pro- 
duced. In April of 1943, the company received the 
Army and Navy Award for its high standard of 
production efficiency. 

After the death of Mr. Roth on April 30, 1945, 
the stock of The Eclipse Lawn Mower Co. was sold 
by the Adams family to the Buffalo Bolt Company 
of North Tonawanda, New York. 

Th"? company continued to expand and ware- 
house buildings were erected in 1950 and 1954, in- 
cluding an enclosed railroad siding which will ac- 
commodate four freight cars at one time. The or- 
ganization now has approximately 200,000 square 
feet of floor space and employs up to 275 persons. 



In 1950, at the time of the company's 50th anni- 
v--)rEary, a policy of awarding pins to employees 
for continuous length of service was announced. 

The firm first produced the rotary mower dur- 
ing the 1953 season, and following the national 
trend, this type now constitutes the major portion 
oi its unit sales. 

In December, 1956, The Eclipse Lawn Mower 
Co. purchased the power chain saw business of 
the Northern States Equipment Company of Rich- 
land Center, Wisconsin, and is currently producing 
saws under the trade name "Wasp" in the local 
plant. 

Houdaille Industries, Inc. of Buffalo, New York, 
in October, 1958, purchased a controlling interest 
in the capital stock of Buffalo-Eclipse Corporation, 
including the local plant. This acquisition was part 
of a program of diversification by Houdaille Indust- 
ries, whose major business is producing parts for 
automobile manufacturers and products for the 
construction industries. 





Congratulations 

PROPHETSTOWN 

On Your 

loa™ 

ANNIVERSARY 



Your Legislator from this District for 20 Years. 



Your City Mayor for 20 Years. 



George S.Brydia 



No citizen could ask for more than to serve your interests in public office 
for 40 years. 

I wish to thank the persons who have contributed to my success both as 
your mayor and legislator. 

My particular congratulations go to the Prophetstown Echo, your founding 
fathers, and the citizens who have contributed their time and talents to make 
this the greatest town under 2,000 population in the state of Illinois. 

May our Progress continue for the next 100 years and generations to come. 








Civil War Veterans 




Albart Field Home Corner of Locust and West 3rd 




'I'M \ ' 



The Dr. Mosher Home on Comer of Lafayette and 
W. 3rd 




The C. Deane Frary Home 



Coon Creek 



YEAR AF-TEIt YBAItp 

tsst 



Cojisfsfeiif 
Hrfomumel 




ART FOTZLER - Prophetstown, III. 
JOHN SIPPEL - Prophetstown, III. 
WM. OBERLE - Geneseo, III. 



mmmfMm 

FREDIE J. BLACKERT - Tampico, III. 
D. B. D. FARM - Lyndon, III. 
HOWARD OBERLE - Prophetstown 



Wrl»< For Our Broehura or ASK YOUK NIAKUT HULTINft SIALIt 

^'^ HULTING HYBRIDS 

j;^|^4 Headquarters: Geneseo, Illinois 
SINCE iS9b "The Home of ConshHnt PcrformaflC*" 




Real Estate 



FARM LOANS HOME LOANS 




EUGENE WILSON 

308 W. 2nd St. 
PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 

PHONE 6342 



GEORGE F. WILSON 



1 Mile East of Prophetstown 

ON ROUTE 172 

PHONE 5359 



BUY or SELL 



FARMS 



HOMES 



LOTS 



BUSINESS 




Prophetstown State Park embraces fifty-three acres 
land along Rock River and Coon Creek. A Winnebago In- 
an village was located in this general locality. This park 
3s been developed during the administration of Governor 
'illiam G. Stratton. 




Some Sunday Afternoon 




George S. Brydia 

While many midwest rural communities have remained 
tic since an original spurt of growth around 1900, Prophets- 
m has enioyed an uninterrupted progress. Many people, 
srested in community as well as self, have contributed to 
; success. No person, however, has had a greater political 
uence on Prophetstovim than Rep. George S. Brydia. As 
)cer, salesman, ten-term mayor and finally as representa- 
3 in the state legislature since 1939, Mr. Brydia has aroused 
us all the sense of community pride so essential to growth. 




"The Village Smithy Stands 




"Out For a Spin" 




ROMANS 



TAVERN 





~»-j mii\jin. '! V » 



^ 



This building was built in 1854 by Horace Annis, Thomas Bryant, and the Warner brothers. It was 
used as a plow and wagon factory. It was located on the corner of Locust and West 3rd Street. 




And Night 





ROLLO MOTOR SALES 

TELEPHONE 2031 
112 RAILROAD STREET 

Prophetstown, Illinois 





PROPHETSTOWN FEED MILL 

FEEDS, SEEDS, FERTILIZERS, FARM SUPPLIES 
Telephone 5431 



From Economic Growth to Depression 



Our Trf\;thical sentinel on Thunderbolt norx> wit- 
nesses an era of scientific brilliance. The major 
miracles of electricity, the gasoline engine, radio 
and telephone are altering ever\)ones way of life. 
The following notes, taken from newspaper ac- 
counts beginning at the turn of the century can- 
not record these changes which took place too 
gradually to he discernable but they may refresh 
a memory. 

At a meeting of the town council, Jan. 6, 1900, 
there were the usual bills and discussions, mainly 
about putting in permanent sidewalks. Seemed 
then, as now, dogs sometimes overflowed the town, 
making it necessary to kill some. A bill of $1.50 
was presented the council, and was allowed, for 
the burial of dead dogs. Winter weather, too, ran 
about like 1959 — plenty of ice and snow, which 
caused the low-lands to be flooded with water un- 
til April 7, when the ice gorge broke on "big is- 
land" and the water was gone from the bottoms in 
a few hours. 

But a good ice crop in those days was a thing 
of joy. N. C. Warner reaped a good harvest that 




year and came out with a new wagon for deliver- 
ing ice. It was a vivid yellow with "ICE" painted 
on each side in big black letters. This was in May 
and it was getting warmer each day. 

The fifteenth class of the high school held its 
commencement exercises June 9 with 12 gradu- 
ates. The subject of one girl's address was, "After 
Graduation, What for Girls?" 

The walks in front of the Eureka Hotel were 
a disgrace, so it asked the town for new board 
walks. However, many brick and cement walks 
were being installed at this time. H. C. Besee com- 
pleted the census of Prophetstown June 23. The 
population was 1,100. On this day, W. J. Thomp- 







kcCstoW 




SOLIDAY FARM EQUIPMENT 




Sales & Service 



Prophetstown, III. 



Telephone 2641 




Fourth of July — Prophetsfown — 1897 



son urged the ladies, in his ad, to keep cool and 
lovely in one of his summer corsets at 30, 50 and 
98 cents. He also had sunbonnets for 15 cents each. 

Prophetstown celebrated the 4th of July with 
a parade featuring a band. There were also pat- 
riotic speeches and you could refresh yourself 
at a lemonade stand to be found anywhere about 
town. The saloons were open and well patronized, 
but no arrests were made. Marshal Lewis was 
able to handle law and order all by himself. In 
the evening, there was dancing at Shole's Hall 
and fireworks. 

Messrs. McNeill, Kempster, Hill and Richards, 
had a steamboat built 14x50, powered by a 12 
HP steam engine capable of navigating in a 12 
foot channel. It was strictly a pleasure boot and 
a winter trip on the Mississippi River was planned. 

It was hot in July, 1900 — boys, yes, even men 
were going in swimming in "birthday clothes" of 
the mouth of Coon Creek. Town orders this to be 
stopped or else. August 18, hunters were warned 
to let those prairie chickens alone until the season 
opens, or else, too. 

An enterprising farmer sold 200 head of 
cattle to Middelton for $11,543. 

Groceries in 1902 appear to us now to have 
been exteremely low priced, such as 10 pounds of 
coffee, $1.00; Old Country long-cut smoking tobac- 
co, 25 cents per pound and 3 cans of peas for 25 
cents. Good grade muslin sold for 5^ cents a 
yard and percale for 8 to 10 cents per yard. 

Fifty alumni were present for the annual 
meeting at the high school in June. One morning 
that month there were ninety tickets sold to pas- 
sengers at the local depot, who were either going 



to Tampico or Walnut, (could they have been shop- 
pers?). 

Sidewalks were much of the town's worries in 
early 20th century and now June 21, 1902, someone 
conceived the idea that an 8 foot walk was entirely 
too narrow and cited the town board to look at 
other towns and see what wide walks they had — 
10 to 16 feet. "Why couldn't Prophetstown get out 
of a rut and widen its walks, and while we are 
about it, let's get rid of hitching posts and quit 
making a barnyard out of Main St." 

January, 1903 saw the completion of two brick 
buildings 54x70 ft. by F. P. Dudley at 351 Wash- 
ington at a cost of over $10,000. The Citizen's Bonk 
building at 338 Washington was also completed 
that month. 

The village board called a meeting for the pur- 
pose of abolishing card playing in saloons and to 
stop betting on games at the bowling alley. 

It is worth a look through the Echos of early and 
middle 1900'? just to see the elaborately displayed 




CONGRATULATIONS 

from the 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

OF 

FIRST TRUST AND 
lAVINGS BANK 

OF ALBANY, ILLINOIS 



E. Don Hanson, President 

D. V. Potter, Vice President 
Lillian M. Lewis, Cashier 
Wesley J. Pessman 
Roy VenHuizen 

Irene E. Hanson 
E. J. Dolan 

Member F. D. I. C. 



PLUMBING HEATING 

APPLIANCES 

Full line of Plumbing Fixtures 
and Heating Units 

FAIRBANKS-MORSE 

Pumps, Hot Water Heaters, etc. 

Mulcay Plumbing 



106 Short Street 
Phone 4841 



Ray Mulcay 

John Bollivar 

Roland Dessing 

Carl Ediund 



H. & L Produce 



Buyers of Eggs and Hens 



We dress poultry for lockers and home freezers. 



Phone 6631 for Appointments 







SELANDER AND JONES 

RIVER RUN GRAVEL 
FOR ALL CEMENT WORK 

WE DELIVER 



404 EAST 



TELE. 5811 



ads of the many patent medicines on the market 
at that time. In most cases, the ad features a very 
beautiful lady just radiating health and happin- 
ess and all because she had taken and re- 
gained complete health, "thanks to your wonder- 
ful tonic". 

S. E. Eakle of the Leon Community bought the 
Lamont farm on Washington St. Road for $80 an 
acre and sold it in a very short time for $115, the 
highest price paid for land in this communiiy. 

Our village is progressing — the citizens met 
to look over plans for waterworks and the Echo be- 
comes a 7-column, 8-page paper, the only one 
in the county with the exception of the Sterling 
Standard. In April, there was talk of an electric 
railway from Rock Falls to Rock Island and it was 
hoped that Prophetstown would be included en- 
route. The talk went on for many years and that 
was all that ever became of it, but at times it did 
look favorable. 

A town election was held to vote on the liq- 
uor question at which 329 votes were polled for 
and 99 against the sale of liquor. A fire in the P. 
W. Kempster & Co. oil room made the citizens more 
waterworks conscious. A fire of real mention which 
destroyed eight buildings, totaling a loss of $30, 
000, solved the question. There was a bond issue 
for the waterworks and it carried. 



m M" 



^jffii^ 




An Early Parade Float 

The closing of 1903 proves that it sometimes 
takes many years to carry out improvements — 
there was considerable talk for the consolidation of 
rural schools at the close of 1903. 

The Firs' National Bank declared a dividend 
of 10 percent and increased its capital stock from 
$40,000 to $60,000. A lecture at Leon Church "War 
Against Tobacco" followed a 25 cent chicken pie 
supper. 

May 2o, the soldier's monument was erected 
in the cemetery by the GAR. Ads in the Echo of 
June 4 featured calicos, ladies' hosiery in light 
blue, red, white and fancy embroidered black at 
25 cents a pair. Men's suits only $18. Then there 




An Errant Jackson Automobile Hearlens the Horse and Buggy Enthusiasts. 



more M€yfhers buy 




FIRST IN THt NATION 

Mothers all over the nation and right here too, have learned 
to rely on pure, rich and wholesome Borden's milk for finest 
quality. That's why more mothers buy Borden's milk than 
any other brand. Your family, too, deserves to enjoy the 
best. Start serving Borden's today. 

IF IT'S BORDEN'S IT'S GOT TO BE GOOD! 

It's got to be good to he FI?.STI U's got to be good to STAY first! 






•-{4**- 




1913 Scene of Brick Laying on Washington Street 



v/ere windmills, buggies and horseblankets. Eggs 
were retailing for 15 cents a doz. and hogs were 
selling for $5.62 1/2 per cwt.; steers, $6.60 per cwt. 
In July, the merchants voted to close the stores at 
6 o'clock one night each week for that month. 

The waterworks for the town was realized in 
November, 1904, at a cost of $14,830.22. There 
was an engine house of brick 24x24'; 2 VI miles of 
main; 27 hydrants; a hose cart; 400 feet of hose; a 
well 8 feet in diameter and a pump with a capac- 
ity of 250,000 gals, in 24 hours. Glancing through 
the pages of the Echos from now on when there 
was a fire, one can't help sense the feeling of sat- 
isfaction and gratitude everyone had far the wa- 
terworks of Prophetstown. 

F. P. Dudley opened an opera house which 
for many years featured very good stage shows 
and later became a silent movie theatre. 

E. C. Dodge Company of Wisconsin opened a 
creamery here on now E. 3rd. St. The company 
later built a new concrete block building, which is 
now part of the Eclipse factory on E. Railroad St. 
After a time there, the business was moved to 
Tampico. 

The summer of 1906 is a remarkable one in 
Prophetstown, for Billy Sunday, the noted evan- 
gelist, conducted meetings here for four weeks in 
a large tabernacle. It is said, that one Sunday 
there were tliree services and a total of 4,000 peo- 
ple attended during the day. There were a great 



many conversions and free will offerings amounted 
to $2,500. After these meetings, the people were 
aroused to the need of a YMCA and a great deal 
of work was given to this project, but it never mat- 
terialized. 

Dr. J. H. Mosher, prominent physician, pur- 
chased his first automobile, a Reo, for $1,355 and 
c Buick agency was opened by P. W. Kempster 
and Amos Ott. 

Caused by an ice gorge, the Rock River on 
Jan. 14, 1907, rose to its highest point since 1868. 
Oxbow farm lost stock amounting to $4,000. 

Cars were plentiful in 1907 — on May 16, it was 
reported there were 13 car owners in town. One 
farmer on Washington St. Road sought to stop 
the heavy traffic past his farm; so stretched a rope 
across the road. The rope was severed before 
there was an accident. 




Ice Harvesting 



THIS BOOK PUBLISHED 


by 


The Prophetstown Echo 


'The Only Newspaper at the Only Prophetstown in the World' 


Congratulations to Prophetstown on its 


100th ANNIVERSARY 


The Prophetstown Echo 


DON and LEONA BROOKS, Publishers 


Larry Weston, Bessie Lanphere, Neil Oppendike, Eddie Selonder 



THE 

PROPHETSTOWN CENTENNIAL 

INC. 

Proudly Presents 

"BY THESE WATERS" 

A JOHN B. ROGERS SPECTACULAR 

HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC FIELD 
JULY 1-2-3-4 at 8:45 P.M. 



Produced and Directed by 
JOSEPH COLE SIMMONS 



BY THESE WATERS is based on Historical Fact. Slight Changes have been made 
to meet the demands of Staging and for Dramatic Effect. 



COSTUMES, SCENERY, AND LIGHTING BY 

JOHN B. ROGERS PRODUCING CO. 

FOSTORIA, OHIO 



'BY THESE WATERS" 



SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 



PROLOGUE 

A fanfare of trumpets heralds the entrance of 
"Miss Prophetstown"' and the Centennial Princesses. 
The Boy Scouts. Girl Scouts, Cubs. Brownies. Sailor- 
ettes. Indian Princesses. Cadets and Cast present a 
Panorama of Pagentry in honor of Her Majesty and 
the Court of Honor. 



Episode VIII: GAY 90'S 

Bikes, bustles, and mustauches! Grandmam's era 
was filled with fun and excitement. The 4th of July 
picnic down on the river was the big celebration in 
Prophetstown! This day the citizens were in for some- 
thing very unusual!! 



Episode I: IN THE BEGINNING 

Here we see the first inhabitant of what has now 
become our Prophetstown . . . The Red Man. Wabokie- 
shiek. The Prophet, meets with his warrior friend, 
Blackhawk. and the ceremony of the Calumet is per- 
formed as we pay tribute to the first inhabitants of 
the Rock River area. 

Episode II: THE FIRST AMERICAN 

Indeed, the Indian was the first American. Their 
ideals and their customs differed with those of the 
white man, but the Indians had their own superstitions 
and beliefs. The beautiful Indian Ballet signifies the 
consecration to the spirits. The Winnebago Maidens 
perform the Dance of The Green Corn. 

Episode III: WESTWARD HO! 

Whiteside County is laid out! Asa Crook, the first 
settler gives us an inside look at the early settlers" lives, 
their heartbreak and sorrow, their loves and their in- 
satiable desire to brave the unknown. 



Episode IX: WORLD WAR I 

1914! The people of Prophetstown heard the rumb- 
lings of war. Hands across the sea plead for help, and 
the citizens answer the call! We pay tribute to those 
who served . . . and to those who did not return. 



Episode X: THE ROARING 20'S 

Flivvers, flappers, and flag-pole sitters. It was the 
age of bobbed hair, hip flasks, and two cars in every 
garage! The war to end wars was over ... a carefree 
nonchalance replaced "Over There" and, of course, there 
was the dance craze of the nation . . . The Charleston! 



Episode XI: TEPID 30'S 

Bankruptcy! Suicide! Breadlines! With the rest of 
the nation, Prophetstown tightened her belt and waited. 
Then the answer came: The Works Progress Admini- 
stration. 



Episode IV: PATH OF THE CROSS 

Asa Crook's house was the site of the first religious 
service held in Prophetstown. The early pioneer in 
this area brought with him, his tools, his family, his 
determination, and most of all. his faith in God. 

Episode V: THE THREE R'S 

Prophetstown quickly became aware of the need 
to educate the young. An amusing scene in the first 
school conducted by Miss Lovica Hamilton proves be- 
yond a doubt that even in those days children were 
still children! 

Episode VI: CHAPTER IN BLACK 

Prophetstown had barely got over celebrating its 
incorporation in 1859 when, like a thunderbolt, dissen- 
sion struck and our nation became divided. We see the 
moving speech from Gettysburg that was so instrumen- 
tal in the reformation of these United States. 

Episode VII: COMING OF THE IRON HORSE 

The courage of the citizens of Prophetstown is 
once more rewarded, for now we witness the fruit of 
many hard years of waiting and sacrifice. Contributions 
had repeatedly drained the purses and still yielded no 
railroad in the town. Finally, the courage and perse- 
verance of the early settlers paid off; In 1871 The Chi- 
cago. Burlington & Quincy line was finished and Pro- 
phetstown had her railroad! 



Episode XII: WORLD WAR II 

December 7, 1941 . . . and Prophetstown is shocked, 
for once again the terror of war falls on the ears of 
people just getting over the depression. All America 
stood in awe at the horrors of modern warfare. We stand 
in revei-ence to those who served so gallantly. Indeed 
let us pray . . .lest we forget! 



Episode XIII: THE ATOMIC AGE 

1945! Our fn-st look at the Atomic Bomb! What 
will man do with his discovery? In one blaze will all 
things be gone? The Empire State . . . the Parthenon? 
Must the sudden atom's flash turn cities and statues 
and poems to ashes? Only tomorrow can tell. 



FINALE 

The entire cast comes forward to salute the future. 
Our tomorrow is built on understanding and reverence 
towards our yesterday. Stand here today and see to- 
morrow! 



FIREWORKS 

The Illinois Fireworks Company presents a thrill- 
ing pyrotechnic display! A brilliant climax to "BY 
THESE WATERS". 



CAST 



'BY THESE WATERS" 



"PROLOGUE" Sponsored By; Cheerleaders, Majorettes, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Brownies, Cubs, Amer. Legion. 
NARRATORS: Rev. Nelson Chasteen, Leah Ewalt, Idabelle Wildman, Avis Nelson, George Matthews 
THE PROPHET: V. R. Olmstead 
BLACKHAWK: Niel Robinson 



TRUMPETERS— Beth Robinson, Donna Farrell, Lynette Edlund, 
Jerri Dail. 

GIRL SCOUTS— Jody Toppert, Marsha Swanson. Linda Stokes, 
Trudy Roman, Susaii Moore, Susan Metzner, Joan May, Rita Rae 
Maes, Jeralyn Sue Johnson, Diane Hoogerwerf, Ann Hamilton, 
Jean Ann Thompson. Cathy Swanson, Jeannie Schuneman, Pats> 
Nuelle, Vera Lea Meyer, Bridget McNeil, Jane Mathis, Becky 
Jorgensen, Nyla Hunsberger, Rita Hill, Sheri Gentz, Penny .lames, 
Connie Mattson, Donna Selander, Linda Fisk. Donna Dessing, Linda 
Bender, Kathy Gardner, Kathleen Dorathy, Christie Brown, Lynn 
Bauer. 
BROWNIES— Phyllis Saupe, Debra McNeill. Kathleen Holland, 



Candy Gentz, Vicky Franks, Ann Finnecum, Susan Dorathy, Mar^- 

Dover, lona Bruckner, Beverly Allen, Debra Jo Ross, Brenda 

Mattson, Beth Hamilton, Ann Gardner, LeEtta Frank, Tamra 

Draper, Connie Dorathy, Linda Bruckner, Anita Sue Brown, 

Cathy Verwer, Connie Bauer. 

BOY' SCOUTS— Lyle Upton, John McMillan, Rodney Clarquisl, 

Mark Willkinson, David Tenley, Jeff Kiner, Jim Moews, Nate 

Brown, Lvnne Clariquist. 

CUB SCOUTS-Steve Ackeberg, Ronnie May, Mark Mulci'v, Larry 

Mattson. 

COLORGUARDS— Robert W. HumVnel, Royal A. Jackson, Marvin 

Alhrecht, Robert Frain, Robert Benstrom, Dean Hansen. 



EPISODE I— "IN THE BEGINNING" 

Sponsored By: Prophetstown Profit Makers 4-H Club, Prophetstown High School 

Jerri Dail, Karen Mulcay, Karen Newlon. Sharon Morris, Susan Cina Randall, Anita Weber, Judy Newlon, Linda Johnson, Keith 

Moews, Carol Kerkering, Jan Roman, Beth Detra, Mary S. Ander- Blackert, Bob Wirth. George R. Perkins, Jerry Oberle, Gary 

son, Marilou Waite, Eileen Schehl, Idonna Morse, Virginia Detra, Bauer, Bob Wirth. Ronald D. Mickley, Stanley Robinson, Jon Kiner. 

EPISODE II— "THE FIRST AMERICAN" 

Same as Episode I 

EPISODE III— "WESTWARD HO" 

Sponsored By: Tuesday Evening Club, Community Mixers Home Bureau 

Mrs. Ralph Farrell, Ruth Schutt, Glenn Schutt, Paul Detra, Larry Gloria Schutt, Robert Eugene Frey, Lawrence DeNeve, Mrs. 

Joe DeNeve, Mrs. Lawrence DeNeve, Mrs. Eugene Frey, Mary Ernest Buck, Joyce Wagenecht, Ernest Sawyer, Rita Wagenecht, 

DeNeve, Ernest Buck, Larry Wagenecht, Carlene Sawyer, Dale Frank Fotzler, Mrs. Lenola Neumann, Robert E. Anderson, Shir- 

Wagenecht, Mrs. Frank Fotzler, Nancy Neumann, Bill Anderson, ley J. Anderson, George Matthews, George E. Neumann. Lynne 

Wilma Matthews, Eileen Detra, Frank Schehl, Mrs. Frank Schehl, McKenna, Pam McKenna, Eugene Frey, Fritz DeNeve. 

EPISODE IV— "PATH OF THE CROSS" 

Dorothy Kilberg, Mrs. Dale Sibley, Mrs. Charles Lancaster, Mrs. 
Floy Aylsworth Jones, Mrs. Ward Scott, Ted Taber, Mrs. Glen 
Lancaster, Leslie Kilberg, Elmer E. Johnson, Charles Lancaster. 
Dale Sibley, Mrs. Elmer E. Johnson, Linda Stokes, Rose Thor- 

EPISODE V— "THE THREE R'S" 

Sponsored By: The Royal Neighbors of America 

Connie Sue Swanson, Ronnie Swanson, Duane Clayton Brooks. 
Susan Dorathy, Linda Kennedy, James Dennis, Linda Dennis, 
Thomas Lanphere, Neil K. Swanson, Marsha Ann Brooks, Kath- 
leen Dorathy, John Kennedy, Kathryn Anne Dennis, Mickael 

EPISODE VI— "CHAPTER IN BLACK" 

Gary Bauer, Mary Beth Bauer, Eileen Castelein, Mrs. Bill Conroy, 
Dennis Conroy, Mary Conroy, Mr. Art DeReu. Lynn DeReu, Eileen 
Schehl, Mrs. Ernest J. Verhulst, Rita VanDeMark, Cindy Morris, 
Clellan Morris, Frieda Wyckhuys, Mark Bauer, Leo Castelein, Mr. 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: Ralph Matthews 

EPISODE VII— "THE COMING OF THE IRON HORSE" 

Same as Episode VI 

EPISODE VIII— "THE GAY 90'S" 

LILIAN RUSSELL: Kay Farrell 

Sponsored By: West Hume Ladies' Club Wa-Tan-Ye 

Carlyle Sandrock, I\-rs. Btrnice Sandrock, I\uv\ Carlyle Sandrock, 
Cathy Sandrock, Dean F. Sandrock, Fred Sandrock, Thomas Lan- 
phere, Bessie Lanphere, Kenneth Hansen, Bonnie Hansen, Marilyn 
R. Siefken, Verna Mildred Fotzler, Art Fotzler, Helen Sandrock, 

Floradora Quartet - Sponsored By: Leon Methodist Men's Club 

Donald Bollivar, Gerald J. Peters, Edna Weber, Paul Weber, Mrs. Donald Bollivar, Glad.vs Peters, Warren Weber, Amy Jean Weber. 

Bathing Beauties - Sponsored By: Leon Wide-Awakes 4-H Club 
Becky Rasei , Sharon Gentz, Terry Boone, Connie Thor.nahien. Beverley Stewart. 

Can-Can Dancers - Sponsored By: Portland Community Club 

Janice Bradley, Sandy Moews, Marilyn Melton, Kay F. Johnson, Betty Stralow. 

Barjara Rsul, Dorothy Moews, Joyce Bennett, Eilien Anderson. 

EPISODE IX— "WORLD WAR I" 

Sponsored By: Portland Social Club — Gail Goodell. Frank Fotzler, Doug Sandrock 

EPISODE X— "THE ROARING 20'S" 

Cina Randall, Carol Kerkering, Susan A. Moews. 
CHARLESTON DANCERS -Tom Robinson, Leo Castelein, Laura 
Upton, Beverly Adolf. Jim Johnson, Dick Fotzler, Barbara Aaoii, 

EPISODE XI— "THE TEPID THIRTIES" 

Cast members from other scenes. 

EPISODE XII— "WORLD WAR 11' 

Robert W. Hummel, Royal A. Jackson, Marvin Albrecht, Robert Frain, Robert Benstrom, Dean Hansen 

EPISODE XIII— "THE ATOMIC AGE" 

Same as Episode XII 

FINALE: Entire Cast . - - 



mahlen, Jim Brady, John Brady, Howard Burdsall, Glen L. Lan- 
caster, Lawrence Kiner, Mrs. Lawrence Kiner, Cecil dinger, 
Elnora Z. Burdsall, Ann Hamilton, Beth Hamilton, Sharon Chas- 
teen. 



Dennis, Paula Church, Kathy Sue Lanphere. 

SCHOOL GIRL DANCE- -Sally Mathis, Delores Beechel, Beth 
Robinson, Lynette Edlund, Sharon Morris, Eileen Schehl, Marilou 
Waite, Jerri Dail, Susan Moews, Karen Newlon, Karen Mulcay. 



Bill Conroy, Mrs. William Conroy, Dottie Lou Conroy, William 
Conroy, Mrs. Art DeReu, Karen Newlon, Ernest J. Verhulst, Allan 
M. VanDeMark, Alice Morris, Johnee Wyckhuvs. Ed Maes, Mrs. 
Ed Maes. 



David Lee Matthews, Hazel Sandrock, Douglas Sandrock, Frank 
Lanphere, Kathy Sue Lanphere, Mildred Hansen, Prances Hansen. 
Robert O. Siefken. 




THE BROTHERS 




-'-^>^4<BW8MMP9r 







THE SISTERS O 




)F THE BRUSH 




THE SWISH 




1959 New and Old City Council 

Arnold Waite, Mayor L. K, Groharing, City Clerk Mable Harms, Alex Bolhous, 
George Sibley. 

Ross Morgan, Leslie Kilberg, Robert Herald, C. A. Conrad, city treasurer; 
Everette Brown, Abram Thompson. " A , 




Centennial Planning Committee and Division Heads 

M. L. Kemp, Mayor Groharing, Harold Plautz, Mrs. C. A. Conrad, C. A. 
Conrad. 

Dwight Stokes, F. L. Dudley, Roger Kerkering, Randall Tenley. 

Arnold Waite, Mrs. Robert Herald, Louis Hummel, R. O. Siefken. 

Don Brooks, Eddie Lindskog, R. G. Rowland, Donald L. Sipe. , .1 , 



Patrons Ticket Holders 



Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Taber 

Mrs. Clara Baldwin 

J. H. Hamilton, Sheriff 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Clausen 

Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Conrad 

Mr, and Mrs. Robert Herald 

Mabel M. Brown, D.O. 

Mr. Cecil dinger 

Farmers' National Bank 

Mi-, and Mrs. Roy Fisk 

Paxson Sisters 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Deane Frary 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Frary 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Fenn 

Mrs. G. H. Haight 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Sipe 

Mr. and Mrs. George Yager 

Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Mathis 

Mr. and Mrs. Randall Tenley 

Mr. and Mrs, Jess Urick 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Olsson 

Mrs. Minnie dinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Walt Sommers 

Mr, and Mrs, D. O, Bayles 

Miss Hazel Wait 

Mr, and Mrs. Earl Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Breed 

Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Nelson 

J. L. Ribble 

Gibson Bros. Oil 

Gracey Fur Shop, Dixon 



C. H. McGinn 

Bob Propheter Construction Co, 

Mr. and Mrs, Elmer Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Waite 

Mr, and Mrs, Dean Gardner 

Mr, and Mrs. Alex Bolhous 

M/Sgt. and Mrs. C. W. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Burdsall 

Mrs. Mary McGrady 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Lyon 

Mr, and Mrs, Lyle Hammelman 

Mrs. Eva Fisk 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldon Blair 

Mr. and Mrs. Buel Brewer 

Mrs. Wm, Hagel 

Mr, and Mrs. Howard Matthews 

Mr, and Mrs, R. W. Matthews 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark Obendorf 

Miss Jeanette Obendorf 

Mr, and Mrs. Lawrence Cornelius 

Miss Linda Cornelius 

Mr. and Mrs, Forrest Lyon 

Mrs, Harry Hammond 

Mr. and Mrs. Lysle Soliday 

C. K. Willett, Construction Engineer 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schomerus 

Clinton Block Co. 

Mr, and Mrs, Frank Dudley 

Miss Beverley Stewart 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Stewart 

Mrs. Mabel Harms 



Sutton Brothers 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Emery 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Clary 

Miss LeEtta Frank 

Master Roger Frank 

Mr, and Mrs, Lloyd Frank 

Mr, and Mrs. S. G. Wildman 

Mr, and Mrs, Kenneth Moore 

Mr. C. Neal Turner 

Mr. and Mrs, Leslie Cady 

Mr, and Mrs, Marshall DeMey 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bergonz 

Rock Island Mill Works 

Mr. and Mrs, L. K. Groharing 

Mr, and Mrs, Val Johnson 

Mrs, Myrtle McDougall 

Mr. and Mrs, Francis Pierceson 

Jim Fisk Family 

Miss Lilah Weburg 

Mr, and Mrs, Abe Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs, Henry Thormahlen 

Mr, and Mrs, Chas, Lancaster 

Mrs, Lena Aylsworth 

Mrs. Floy Aylsworth Jones 

The Daily Gazette, Sterling 

Mrs. Lauretta Roth Schlauch 

Mrs. Marvin Thomsen 

Mr. and Mrs, Harold Plautz 

Senator and Mrs. Dennis J. Collins 

The Honorable Geo. and Mrs. Brydia 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Brewer 

Mr. and Mrs. Quincey Kemmis 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Clark 



Queen's Prizes 



Week's Trip to New York City at New Yorker Hotel 

Silver Plate Bowl — Ikora Importers, Inc. 

Seven Piece Glass Set — West Virginia Glass Co, 

Jamaica Shorts and Matching Blouse — Washington 
Manufacturing Co, 

Two Purses — Apparel Shop 

One Set Boontonware — Ace Hardware 

Bottle White Shoulders Perfume — C, W, Fenn & Son 

Portable Radio — Western Auto Store 

Eight Goblets of Fostoria — Herald's Drug Store 



A Clock— Gambles Store 

Necklace Set — Weburg Jewelry 

RCA Clock Radio — Sommers Song Shop 

Three-Pc, Matched Samsonite Luggage Set — Peterson's 
Department Store 

$5,00 Gift Certificate— J. C. Penny 

$25.00 Gift Certificate^John D. VanAUen & Sons 

Imprinted Stationery and Lifetime Subscription To 
Prophetstown Echo — Echo 

Bathing Suit — DeAnne's Shop 



Lineup of Events 



SUNDAY, JUNE 28 — Faith of Our Fathers Day 

S-ll:30 a.m. Morning Worship in All Local Churches 
8 p.m. Out Door Service, Athletic Field; An all church 



devotional and musical 
choir of Andover. 



program featuring youth 



5-7 p.m. Dinner at Grade School 
8 p.m. Sisters of the Swish Parade, Athletic Field. 
8:15 p.m. Presentation of Pioneer King and Queen. 
8:45 p.m. "By These Waters" Pageant, Athletic Field 
10:15 p.m. Fireworks Display. 



MONDAY, JUNE 29 — Old Fashioned Bargain Day 

Bargains all day in stores of Prophetstown 

9 a.m. Centennial Headquarters. Hospitality Center 
Open 

2 p.m. Kangaroo Court Session 

4 p.m. Kangaroo Court Session 



TUESDAY, JUNE 30 — Old Fashioned Bargain Day 

Bargains all day in stores of Prophetstown 

2 p.m. Kangaroo Court Session 

4 p.m. Kangaroo Court Session 

9 p.m. Centennial Ball — Eddie Howard and his 
orchestra 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 1 — Kid's Day 

9 a.m. Street Carnival Rides and Concessions open. 

10 a.m. Kid's Day Parade 

11:30 a.m. — 1 p.m. Lunch at Grade School gym, 
served by Lutheran ALCW. 

1 p.m. Kid's Day Games and Contests 

2 p.m. Kangaroo Court 
4 p.m. Kangaroo Court 

5-7 p.m. Dinner at Grade School 

8 p.m. Kid's Day Winners Announced, prizes awarded 
8:45 p.m. "By These Waters" Pageant, Athletic Field 
10:15 p.m. Fireworks Displa.v. Athletic Field. 



THURSDAY, JULY 2 — Pioneer Day 

9 a.m. Headquarters, Hospitality Centers, Carnival 
open. 

10 a.m. Threshing Exhibition 

11.30 — 1 p.m. Lunch at Grade School served by Con- 
gregational Women's Fellowship. 

12 noon Tractor Pulling Contest east on Rte. 172 
across from Brookhaven. 

4 p.m. Kangaroo Court 



FRIDAY, JULY 3 — New Frontier Day 

(For high school and college age youth, 14-22) 

9 a.m. Headquarters, Hospitality, Carnivals open. 

10 a.m. Turkey Shoot at Wayne Smith Farm, .8 miles 
south on Rte. 78 

10:30 a.m. Sisters of the Swish Style Show and judg- 
ing at Congregational Church. 

11:30 a.m. — 1 p.m. Lunch at Grade School 

1 p.m. Rolle Bolle Tournament 

1:30 p.m. Archery Shoot, Log Pulling Contest, State 
Park 

2:30 Tug of War, State Park 

4 p.m. Greased Pig Chase 

'Youth's Kangaroo Court in Session during Afternoon 

5-7 p.m. Dinner at Grade School 

8 p.m. Youth's Past and Future Fashion Show, Athle- 
tic Field 

8:45 p.m. "By These Waters" Pageant, Athletic Field 

9:30 p.m. Youth's Dance and Dessert Box Social, 
Grade School 

10:15 Fireworks Display. 



SATURDAY, JULY 4 — Old Glory Day 

9 a.m. Headquarters, Hospitality, Carnival open. 

9:30 a.m. Flag Raising Ceremony. Washington and 
Railroad Streets. 

9:50 a.m. Merchants drawing for Bargain Days Regis- 
trant 

10 a.m. Parade 

10:30 — 1 p.m. Lunch at Grade School gym 

1 p.m. Horse Show 

5-7 Dinner at Grade School 

7:30 p.m. Beard Judging Contest 

8:00 p.m. Remington Rand shaving Contest. 

30 p.m. Time Capsule Memorial Service 

45 p.m. "By These Waters" Pageant, Athletic Field 

10:15 p.m. Gigantic Fireworks Display open to the 
public after conclusion of Pageant. 

10:45 p.m. Time Capsule Burial Procession. 




-"^fe*;} 



r f 



teed Mill Before Fire of 1915 



The Present Feed Mill 



P. W. Kempster & Co. Hardware Store and 
warehouse burned in January, 1908, at a loss of 
848,000. The east part of the building now occu- 
pied by International Harvester Co. and Ray Mul- 
cay is the brick building replaced by .Mr. Kemp- 
ster in 1910. 

With cars now so numerous it was assumed 
the practice of stealing horses would be aban- 
doned; so the Horse Thief Detective Club voted to 
disband in 1908. 

A building boom hit Prophetstown in 1910. At 
one time there were 14 buildings under construc- 
tion. 

The mud on Main Street became a problem 
during a January thaw in 1911. The council gave 
the merchants permission to dump their ashes in 
the holes, provided they used precaution and did 
not put them in the gutters. 

The census showed Prophetstown had a popu- 
lation of 1,083 in 1911, a decline from the 1,300 res- 
idents in 1880. 

Improvements and changes in our community 
this year included a new ladies' waiting room in 



McBride's feed shed and livery at a cost of $200; 
the old Leon Church built in 1881 was moved to 
the Henry Stewart farm and George Fisk built the 
largest bam in Whiteside County. 

One could purchase a set of dentures in 1911 
for $6, a crown for $4 and bridgework for $4. 

Dreamland Movie was opened in the Sholes 
building, now the Tov/n Theatre. 

During the fall and winter months, George 
Drummet sold 320 acres of land for $125 an acre; 
a hog cholera epidemic hit the community and 
10 to 15 hogs died a day on the Geo. Warner fann. 
Vaccination had not come into use at this time for 
the University of Illinois advised giving medicine 
to the animals to overcome the disease. 

In the way of progress, the Thursday Club 
raised $157.25 for the purpose of organizing a city 
band. The Methodist Church rebuilt the parson- 
age barn after a fire caused considerable dam- 
age. It was enlarged because more room was 
needed for hay. Gene Underhill bought the first 
com picker for $400. A iomado hit town late in 
April damaging buildings and trees. Marshal John 




Deering Display By the Kempster and Arnett Agency 



Needless 
Causes of 
ACCIDENTS 







Highest Octane Ever Offered! 
Cities Service 




• Speed causes 3 out of 10 
fatalities. Don't speed when 
you drive. 

• Alcohol is the second 

greatest factor in highway 
deaths. Don't drink when 
you drive. 

• Obstruction to Vision is 

involved in 1 out of 7 fatal 
accidents. Make sure wind- 
shield wipers workproperly. 

• Fatigue is an often over- 
looked, but major killer. 
Don't drive when you're 
tired. 

• Defective Vehicles fig- 
' ures in over 3000 fatal ac- 
cidents last year. Have 
your car checked regularly. 

• Jaywalking accounts for 
nearly all pedestrian acci- 
dents. When walking, al- 
ways cross at intersections. 

STOP ACCIDENTS 
STOP IN FOR A SAFETY 
CHECK BEFORE YOUR TT?IP 



Here's a gasolene whose name may be imitated but whose 
quality remains unsurpassed ... a gasolene with well over 
100 octane! 

Now, in Cities Service new 100 Plus, you get the 
hir>hcst octane, the finest performance in automotive 
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If you want the ultimate in luxury performance, you 
want Cities Service new 100 Plus . . . one of three superb 
fuels at Cities Service stations. 



You drive with the best 

by every test 

wfjen you drive 

with Cities Service 




CITIES PRVICE 



JOHN'S 



CITIES SERVICE STATION 

"the handiest corner in town" 




p. member These — Bicycle and Swing? 

Lewis completed his 12th year sleeping in the 
Citizen's Bank. 

H. C. Adams bought an Enger automobile from 
Simon Keiser for $1750 in 1913. 

This is the year that Prophetstown paved Main 
Street. The work began in August and was com- 
pleted November 15, which was ahead of time 
stated in the contract. Exactly 370,000 bricks were 
laid on a sand bed at a cost of $18,000. There was 
not doubt in the minds of the citizens, and they so 
stated, that his was one improvement in the town 
that would last until the youngest child here was 
100 years old. Of course, this called for a celebra- 
tion and it was in the form of a barbeque on the 
vacant lot west of Kempster's garage. It was esti- 
mated that 3,000 people attended and consumed 
430 pounds of meat, 1800 buns, 10 gallons of milk, 
14 quarts of mustard. 



In February, 1914, good beef steak was sell- 
ing for 20 cents a pound at Brydia's store; pot roast, 
15 cents; hamburger, 16 cents; pork steak, 17 cents 
and sausage, 15 cents. 

The council voted to pave one block on 3rd. St. 
and one block on Lafayette Street. 

The first installment of a serial, "Meridosia 
Days" by R. R. Kiner apeared in "Sports and Field" 
magazine in March. 

While harvesting ice on the river, tw^o teams 
of horses fell through while pulling the ice cutter. 
After two hours they were rescued by putting ropes 
around their necks and pulling them out. There 
was a plentiful supply of ice that year; 4,000 tons 
were harvested and stored in local ice houses. 

It seems this locality has always had the rep- 
utation of producing pork in large amounts. Dur- 
ing a three day period in March, 1915, 3,470 pork- 
ers were sold netting $60,000. 

Eclipse Lawn Mower Company purchased au- 
tomobiles for its salesmen as a means of covering 
their territories. 

William Pettit, widely known for his sorghum 
and cider-making, had a thousand bushels of ap- 
ples on hand at one time in 1915 from which he 
made cider. 

Real estate developments in 1916 included the 
2-story brick building on the west side of Main 
St. built by H. C. Adams. It was to be used as a 
garage on the first floor with office rooms above. 
This is knowm as the Thede building. Earl Mar- 
vel, local contractor, built a concrete block fac- 




Looking East on Washington Street 




"SHORTY" AND BILL 



Congratulations 

Prophetsto^vn 



ON YOUR 



100th Anniversary 
BilPs Schlitz Tavern 



345 Washington 



Phone 3961 



tory. The contract was also let for St. Catherine's 
Church. The Cemetery Ass'n was organized with 
two hundred signers. 

Capt. Wahl of Co. E planned to form a de- 
tached platoon here of 34 men in 1917. This was 
the first gesture in preparation of World War 1. It 
wasn't long before men between the ages of 18 and 
45 were registering all over the country. Word 
came that married men would not be called at 
this time. There were Liberty Bond and Red Cross 
drives. 

Horses still had the lead in 1917 — the asses- 
sor's list showed 957 horses and 225 automobiles 
in the township. Agriculture had become a science 
and local farmers were requesting a county farm 
advisor. Someone conceived the idea that light 
poles did not add to the beauty of Main St. and 
the council had them removed to the alleys. 

A new experience for farmers came in 1918 — 
the government made laws about putting in crops, 
acreages, etc. Our council realized the inconven- 
iences of using horses and so purchased its first 
truck, paying $638 for a Ford chassis. Fire des- 
troyed the recently remodeled Congregational 
Church, the estimated loss was $16,000. Insurance 
coverage was $9,000. War filled the minds and 
hearts of the town in 1918. Mrs. Lillie Lanphere 
sent for sons. Bob, Carl, Emery and Ross, to serve 
their country. Word was received that Lt. Ince, a 
former local boy whipped five Huns single-hand- 
ed. Churches were dedicating service flags. There 
was a false report of Germany's surrender in Oc- 
tober, but Nov. 1 1 we received the great news of 
the signing of the armistice. The town went wild 
in the early morning, celebrating all day and in- 
to the night. Whistles blew, the band was out and 
marched and marched — we even went so far as to 
"hang the Kaiser". All we could think of was our 
160 boys who went "over there" would soon be 
coming home for as yet no casualties had been re- 
ceived. Later came the news of Harry Glass miss- 
ing in action and it was hard to believe as his moth- 
er had so recently received a letter from him say- 
ing he was fine. 1918 also saw that well-remem- 
bered Spanish Influenza epidemic. This was the 
ultimate cause of the deaths of three of our boys, 

■ ^ 





Battensby House 



Mrs. Henry C. Adams — Donor of Library 

Carl Lanphere, Edward Johnson and Homer Rose- 
lieb, in camps. Influenza also broke out in our 
town in September and extended into the spring of 
1919. Not many homes escaped the fast moving 
epidemic and though our doctors labored so hard, 
many lives were lost at home too. 

Many of our boys were returning home from 
overseas in 1919 and subscriptions were taken to 
erect a monument for soldiers from this commun- 
ity. It would be located on Washington and 3rd 
Street intersection. A big celebration was held for 
*he unveiling of this monument in October. 

Farm laborers were offered $100 per month 
with board and washing thrown in; and electric- 
ity became a commodity on many farms in 1920. 
Strawberries sold for $6 a case and hogs were $13 
per cwt. Easter came on April 6 and the day be- 
fore it was 18 above zero with a 2 inch snow — 
some people got out their cutters for a brisk spring 
ride. 




CORA'S LUNCH 



Home Cooking 



Quick Service 



QUALITY CONSTRUCTION BY 



Morris Dever Builders Firm 



Telephone 3501 




Home, Sweet Home 

Board of Trade and Whiteside Co. Farm Bu- 
-eau opened a joint office in the lohn Houch build- 
ing and the American Legion was organized. Evi- 
dently, a stock yard didn't hove a more pleasant 
aroma in 1920 than in 1959, for we found that Wm. 
Pettit offered the railroad free land, so as to get it 
out of town. 

The Eclipse Lawn Mower Company built a 
woodworking shop and foundry on Locust and 4th 
Streets. In May, the Honorable Wm. J. Bryan, many 
times candidate for President of the U. S., spoke 
in the foundry building before a crowd of 1,200 
oeople. His subject was "Brother or Brute" 

The first shipment of clam shells from Rock 
River was made at a price of $14 a ton. The coun- 
cil let the contract for boulevard lights at a price 
of $3,108. The contract called for 17, 5-light posts 
and 14, 3-light posts. West 3rd Street was widened 
to 35 feet and curbing installed at a cost of $1,408. 
Glenn Daft and ]. H. Marshall bought "The Pro- 
phetstown Echo". 

John Lewis, Prophetstown's revered colored 
gentleman and many years the town marshal at- 
tended Old Settler's Picnic at Lyndon again in 1921 
and reported he had not missed a year going to the 
picnic since 1866. Another of John's yearly affairs 
was his coon and possum dinner. His guests 
were folks from all walks of life and came from var- 
ious sections of the country. John always found a 




generous free-will gift when folks had gone home 
in appreciation for the bounteous meal. 

In 1922, a passenger Buick touring car sold 
for $935 and a Samson tractor brought $445. No. 2 
com sold for 44 cents a bushel; oats 32 cents a bush- 
el; wheat $1.15 and Pocahontas egg coal was $12 
a ton. 

Lyle Upton rescued Mrs. J. J. Conrad and Mrs. 
J. A. Dauntler from a tragic death on the Burlington 
Railroad bridge in 1920 and received a belated 
Carnegie recognition two years later, 1922. A meet- 
ing was held to organize a club for business men 
to be known as the Prophetstown Community and 
Commercial Association. A. S. Greene was the 
president. The American Legion Auxiliary was 
organized and our Post Office became second class. 

Plane rides were sponsored by the American 
Legion in June, 1922, and 30 passengers participa- 
ted. It was the first occasion of this kind held here. 
Parking cars on Main Street was very unsystemat- 
ic up to this time so the street was marked for 
parking. 

Twelve cases of small pox were reported in 
town, but the epidemic was of short duration. 




Did This Prompt Kid's Day? 



The Billy Sunday Tabernacle 

Frary & Frary installed a radio to receive 
market reports in 1923. The city council purchased 
a lungmotor. 

Governor Len Small was the speaker at the 
4th of July celebration in 1923. 

C. C. Hansen and Alfred Clark let the contract 
for an artificial ice plant on East Railroad Street. 

A 3-inch howitzer cannon from the Charleston 
Navy Yard was secured for the park. 

Tha Eclipse factory washing machine became 
a reality in 1924; water meters were installed; man- 
ual training was added to our high school curricu- 
lum; veterans were notified they would receive 
their first bonus and The Echo featured its first 
crossword puzzle, which proved very popular. How- 
ever, the spring season was very late for farmers 
and this year they had their first experience with 
army worms. 




GEO. THOMPSON & SONS 



HOG BUYING AND BANG FEEDS 




WE AIM TO GIVE YOU THE BEST IN FOOD 
AT REASONABLE PRICES ALWAYS. 



BEIENS COFFEE SHOP 




Sherman A. Warner Family 



Folks had troubles in 1925, too — income blanks 
were received by single persons with a net income 
of $1,000 or more and couples with $2,500 or more. 
Well, anyway, only the very rich paid income tax 
in those days. The city bought land north of town 
from J. H. Mosher to assure a paved route coming 
through Prophetstown. 

We voted for city form of government and out 
of the 499 votes cast 160 were against it. Geo. Bry- 
dia was the first mayor. 

Sim Gould purchased the now Elm Court divi- 
sion of three acres and it was incorporated. He 
built the two-story brick building on Washington 
Street now owned by the K. Hansens and occupied 
by Prophetstovm Cleaners. A two-story frame 
building on the west side of Washington St., built 
in 1874 by Seyller and Clementz for a hardware 
store, was razed to make way tor the two-story 
building now occupied by the Federated Store. At 
one time, Mr. Seyller traded the frame building to 
Wm. McNeill for 1,000 acres of land, which he still 
owned in 1926. 

Bank deposits increased nearly a half mil- 
lion in the last five years — 1922-1927 — prosperity 
was on the way. The Booster Club was organized 
with Park Thede its first president. Mrs. Minnie 
Adams gave the library in memory of her hus- 
band, the late H. C. Adams. Hogs sold for $10.40. 
Our telephone operators began saying, "Number, 
please" instead of "Prophetstown" and said it to 
2,000 local calls and 190 long distance calls in one 
day. City residents now had mail delivery. Karl 
McDougall was the first city carrier. 



Surveying was started in 1928 for Route 78 and 
the majority seemed very happy that it would go 
through town. There was a lot of talk of a new high 
school and the Booster Club pledged its support. 

A. severe tornado hit the Reese farm south of town 
near Leon and a fire destroyed Kiner Bros, gro- 
cery siore, Thompson's millinery, Larson Barber- 
shop and Charles Richardson's salesroom, which 
pre was responsible for the addition of a new 
oumper to the fire department. 

Pritchard & Rollo sold Chevrolet touring cars 
■or $495. Our two banks had resouces of $1,371 - 
'■73.19. Business was good and our economy was 
surely on a stable basis. 

Electric refrigerators were becoming one of the 
modem appliances in many homes and business 
houses in 1929. A depression seemed on impossib- 
ility for our banks were better off than three 
months ago. 

This was the year of the first Rooster-Booster 
Day. The librcny and new high school were dedi- 
cated. 

Report of the Shipping Association in 1930 
showed it had paid farmers $2,300 a day all last 
year for livestock. 

Our population was now 1,353 and we voted 
two to one in favor of Sunday movies just when 
prospects were very favorable for both theatres 
to change from silent to talking movies. At a June 
meeting of the Booster Club in 1930, Prophetstown' s 
first Kid's Day was planned. 




A House Afloat 




YORKTOWN LUMBER & GRAIN CO., INC. 

Subsidiary of Rock River Lumber & Grain Co. 

LUMBER, GRAIN & COAL 
P.O. BOX, TAMPICO, ILL. 



DE^AY 







Exterior 

and 

Interior 

Decorating 




Phone Prophetstown 
MAJESKI - DeMAY - LINDBERG - SONNENBERG 



Light Comes to the Prairies 



Sounds too must reach our imaginary viewer from 
Thunderbolt. The shrill laughter of the school 
children and the pleasant Sunday silence of 
community rvorship cannot have greatly changed. 
But the history of the development of our churches 
and schools is the story of a community's search 
for the better life. 




THE METHODIST CHURCH 



The present Methodist Church is an outgrowth 
of a meeting held in the home of Asa Crook on 
Christmas Day in 1835 where a group of friends 
had gathered to visit. A Methodist minister on his 
way across the prairies to found mission societies 
stopped at the Crook home to inquire the way, and 
since he noticed the families represented there, of- 
fered to hold a preaching service if they wished. 
They gladly accepted his offer and a young man 



was sent out with his sleigh to invite and bring 
others to share in the service. 

A short time later an arrangement was made 
with the minister at Elkhorn Grove to hold mid- 
week services in Prophetstown. In 1836 in the home 
of N. G. Reynolds the first Methodist society was 
formed as a mission society and the meetings were 
held in the various homes. 




The first church building was erected in 1864, 
during the pastorate of Rev. Lewis, the land being 
donated by P. B. Reynolds. This was the first church 
in Prophetstown Township. The parsonage was 
built in about 1892. This church building served un- 
til 1895 when the size of the congregation proved 
th9 necessity for a new and larger building which 



was erected and dedicated March 1, 1896, during 
the pastorate of Rev. E. S. Holm. The Sunday 
school was organized about 1923 into a standard 
Sunday school with graded lessons in all class- 
es. Church services and Sunday school were held 
in country schools as mission projects during some 
pastorates. 




/«»««/# /agent 



INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 
Prophetstown, Illinois 




HOOPPOLE LUMBER & GRAIN CO., INC. 

Subsidiary of Rock River Lumber & Grain Co. 

LUMBER, GRAIN & COAL HOOPPOLE, ILL. 



Again, in 1919, the building seemed too small 
for the actvities of the various organizations and 
work was started on remodeling and enlarging 
the church building. At this time a fine new pipe 
organ was installed, the basement was partly ex- 
cavated and finished into a furnace room housing 
a new steam heating plant, a large dining room 
and a well equipped kitchen. The building was re- 
dedicated on January 18, 1920, under the pastorate 
of Rev. Willis Ray Wilson. Only eight years later 
it became necessary to provide more class rooms 
for the Sunday school, and the basement was fully 
excavated under the auditorium, providing three 
more class rooms and additional space for the din- 
ing room. 

In addition to the regular preaching services 
the church cherishes a well organized Men's 



Club, a very active Woman's Society of Christian 
Service, the Wesleyan Fellowship group, the Meth- 
odist Youth Fellowship group, a growing Sunday 
school and social groups for various classes of the 
Sunday school. 

The local church is proud to have had one 
member consecrated to the work of the Kingdom, 
Daisy (Mathis) Vaughn having spent seven years 
as a medical missionary in Nanchong, China. She 
died in 1917 while on furlough in the United States. 

At the present time the church is in a building 
P'ogram with the objective of erecting and entering 
an entirely new sanctuary and religious education 
unit by the end of 1959. The site of the First Meth- 
odist was extended by the purchase of an addi- 
tional lot and the new church is being erected 
around two sides of the old church. 



THE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 



Soon after the Civil War, Swedish immigrants 
were arriving in larger numbers than ever to Pro- 
phetstown, Lyndon, Tampico and Fairfield town- 
ships. These God fearing people did not forget their 
childhood training in their native land. They were 
not only seeking earthly home, but were looking 
for a place to worship God and prepare for that 
eternal home. Since the largest settlement of Swed- 
ish people was in the Tampico vicinity, a church 
was built in Tampico in 1868 in partnership with 
the Baptists. The times of services were alternated. 

The transporation from Prophetstown to Tamp- 
ico was mainly by horse and lumber wagon or in 



winter by bobsled as very few could afford bug- 
gies, surries or cutters. The dirt roads were al- 
most impassable in the spring of the year. Some- 
times when the going was impossible, all occu- 
pants, except the driver had to get off and walk at 
the side of the road until the horses could get bet- 
ter footing. 

The section foreman on the railroad used a 
hand-car and took some people to Tampico to 
church. The men furnished the power by pumping 
the hand-car and the women rode behind on a flat 
car. 

In 1874 the Swedes and Danes near New Bed- 




PROPHETSTOWN FIRE PROTECTION DIST. 



ORGANIZED JULY 27, 1955 



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Bottom row — left to right: Charles Emery, Leslie 
Johnson, Vernon Dorothy, Eldon Blair, Kenneth 
Clark, Robari Siefken, George A. Perkins. 

Second row: Dean Dorothy, Don Hill, Gerald 
Hansen, Clarence Bender, Ernest Buck, Fred Bier- 



mon, Edward Arions. 

Top row: R. G. Rowlond, Harold Ploutz, Robert 
Hoogerwerf, Richord Fomdole, Joe Reichord, Jr., 
Richard Dorothy, Emery Upton. 




OFFICERS 

K. L. CLARK, Chief 

C. E. BENDER 

R. FARNDALE, Assistant Chief 

J. REICHARD, JR., Secretary 



TRUSTEES 

R. G. ROWLAND, Pres. 

H. C. PLAUTZ, Sec. 
F. H. BIERMAN, Trees. 



tord in Fairfield Township organized and built a 
church which attracted the people south and 
southwest of Tampico, who formerly attended the 
Tampico church. By 1879 it became difficult to 
maintain a congregation in Tampico, so the Luth- 
erans finally sold their interest in that church to 
the Baptists. For several months services were held 
in the homes at Prophetstown and Lyndon. On 
March 7, 1880, an organization meeting was held 
and there was a total of forty-one charter members 
listed. 

The Constitution of the Augustona Synod was 
adopted and the church was named the Swedish 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Prophetstown. On 
September 19, 1880, a special meeting was called 
and conducted by Rev. C. O. Granere to deter- 
mine whether or not they should build a church. 
When put to vote, the motion carried and the con- 
tract was let for $430.00 and the building was to be 
finished November 1, the same year. 

in 1897 a Young People's Society was organ- 
ized and is known at present as the Luther League. 

The first resident pastor, Rev. J. E. Holtz, ar- 
rived from Madrid, Iowa, in 1899. He accepted a 
joint call from Prophetstown, Sterling and Morrison 
at a salary of $300.00 from Prophetstown. As the 
congregation had already purchased a lot west of 
the church, the pastor started a subscription list in 
the spring of 1900 and succeeded in raising $1,500 
which paid for the parsonaap 

A basement was dug under the north half of 
the church in 1912 and in 1914 the old board bench- 
es were replaced with pews. 

The years from 1914 until 1920 were troublous 
because of the language question. The young peo- 
ple who had not learned the Swedish language 
were leavina the r-hiirch The RnrrrH of Adminis- 



tration decided to have "Swedish services in the 
morning and English services in the evening. The 
plan did not succeed because the pastor did not 
speak English fluently. The older people insisted 
on having Swedish services. Swedish services were 
entirely discontinued in 1930. 

The name ot the church was changed to The 
First Evangelical Lutheran Church of Prophetstown 
at the annual meeting on January 4, 1923. 

On November 4, 1941, the congregation voted 
lor the incorporation of the church. The question of 
starting a building fund was also discussed and the 
Board of Administration was authorized to purchase 
a suitable site. 

As a means of starting the building fund, the 
"God's Acre" plan was adopted. That is a number 
of farmers set aside one acre of ground and agreed 
to give the produce or the value of the crop each 
year to the building fund. The plan was followed 
tor a few years then dropped. 

The corner lot on North Locust and West 3rd 
Streets was purchased in 1951. In August 1956 
they began to dismatle the house on that lot. Short- 
ly after the dismantling was completed, the build- 
ing program got underway. Now they have a beau- 
liful church in which to worship. The first service 
in the new church was on Easter, March 29, 1959, 
and the dedicatory services were held on April 12, 
1959. 

All women's organizations of the church have 
recently combined under the name of Augustana 
Lutheran Church Women. 

The church has a membership slightly more 
;han 200. Carl O. Swonson is the oldest living 
memher 



THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



A meeting was held at the home of Miss Fran 
ces TuUer on the evening of April 29, 1895, for the 
purpose of considering the organization of the Con- 
gregational Church. The First Congregational 
Church was organized on May 14 1895, 

A meeting was held in Memorial Hall on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1895, with the Rev. W. B. Ladd of the 
Congregational Church of Lyndon conducting the 
services. The service was most successful and the 
Rev. Ladd was invited to return to conduct other 
services which were held in Sholes Hall as more 
room was available there. 

On May 24, 1895, the following members were 
elected to serve as the first officers of the church: 
Clerk, F. W. Sears; Treasurer, Miss Frances Tul- 
ler; Trustees, S. G. Baldwin, Mary K. Hadaway and 
E. R. Conner. 



A building committee consisting of S. G. Bald- 
win, J. J. Green, H. C. Hull, Mary K. Hadaway and 
Anne Southard was appointed. 

Delegates to the Rock River Association were 
elected on September 21, 1895, and the Rev. Ladd 
was requested to present the newly organized 
church for admission. 

The formal dedication of the new church build- 
ing was held on November 17, 1895. The Reverend 
W. B. Ladd was called to serve as the first pas- 
tor. 

The building committee made its financial 
statement and report saying that the ground was 
broken for the First Congregational Church of Pro- 
phetstown May 16, 1895, on the corner lot 102x75 
feet of the Searritt property. The entire cost of the 



COLLINSON BROTHERS 



SAND & GRAVEL 



Prophetstown, Illinois 



WALNUT GROVE PRODUCT CO. 

Manufacturer of 

4x4 FEEDS 

Research is the Extra Ingredient in Every Bag. 

JOHN GENTZ 

PROPHETSTOWN REPRESENTATIVE 

Phone 6444 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 



PROPHETSTOWN 



ON ITS 100th BIRTHDAY 



GARDNER FUNERAL SERVICE 



DEAN GARDNER 



Furniture 



Ambulance Service 




building was $3,778.15 but after collections ol the 
day only a debt of $847.24 remained to be paid. 

The manse was dedicated on Steptembsr 24, 
1899. During the year 1902 a barn was erected on 
the manse lot. Miss Zella Baird's residence was de- 
vised to the church for a manse in 1947. During 
1902 a plan for an addition to the church building 
was reccommended by the board of trustees and 
accepted by the church. In 1906 while evangelistic 
services were being conducted by Billy Sunday, 
140 new members were received into the church. 
With this increase in membership the church felt 
the need to enlarge its building and plans were 
again suggested. An architect was consulted by 
the building committee to draw plans for the addi- 
tion which was to include new class rooms, a 
church parlor, a dining room, gymnasium and kit- 
chen. The addition was dedicated on April 13, 
1913. The entire cost of the improvement amounted 
to $8,000.00 



Five years later on April 15, 1918, the church 
building was destroyed by fire. The church was 
then the center for the Red Cross activities and was 
housing supplies for the local chapter. While the 
church was being rebuilt, services were held in the 
Dudley Auditorium. 

The present church building was dedicated in 
June, 1919. The cost of the new building was ap- 
proximately $40,000. Through an endowment fund 
created by various bequests of property and mon- 
ey through the years it was possible to purchase 
the Battensby property adjoining the church. 

The church has a membership of 319. Mrs. El- 
izabeth Ballard is the oldest living member. 

Serving as valuable adjuncts to the church ore 
the Sunday School, the Woman's Fellowship, the 
Men's Club, the Martha Class, the Golden Guild, 
nnd The Pilgrim Youth Fellowship. 



ST. CATHERINE PARISH 



While the present parish boundaries were es- 
tablished in the memory of living people, the his- 
tory of the parish goes back to the very founda- 
tion of our country. The first flag of a civilized peo- 
ple to wave over the prairies of Illinois was the 
flag of France. The French explorers went up and 
down the Wisconsin, the lllinoiis, the Rock, and 
the Mississippi rivers, trading with the Indians, 
preaching Christianity to them and establishing 
trading posts. 

The European wars between France and Eng- 
land spread to America. England won America at 
the battle of Quebec in 1759 and Illinois passed 
from France to England by the Treaty of Paris in 
1763. Illinois was under the actual rule of England 
' "om 1761 until ths conquest oI George Rogers 
Clark in 1778. As long as Illinois was a possession 
of France, the language, customs and instituiion^ 



were French and the priests who labored in these 
missions were French. When Illinois passed from 
France to England in 1763, these French missionar- 
ies departed. 

Any Catholics in Illinois were under the juris- 
diction of the Bishop of Quebec until the year 1874, 
when a decree from Rome established the newly- 
federated United States as a separate ecclesiastical 
division and the Very Reverend John Carroll was 
appointed Perfect Apostolic. In the year 1810 the 
shurch in Illinois came under the direction of the 
new Bishop of Bardstown, Kentucky, and in 1827 
the Bishop of St. Louis became the spiritual head 
of the area. In 1843 a diocese was established in 
Chicago that included the northern part of the 
State of Illinois. So the area around Prophetstown 
was always under the guidance of the church 
officially, there were few priests who were free to 
come into the district since new settlements were 




VERWER'S PASTRIES 

Full Line of Baked Goods — 

Special Orders for Wedding and 

Special Occasion Cakes. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO PROPHETSTOWN 



ON ITS 100th BIRTHDAY 



PAXSON SISTERS 



VARIETY STORE 




P. & J. 



109 WEST RAILROAD ST. 



GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 



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l1v ' 


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Home Heating Service 



PROPHETSTOWN, ILLINOIS 



WES McMillan 




springing up and the demand for these spiritual 
Fathers was very great. 

Studying the records of the hves of the earhest 
priests we are truly amazed. Their way was laid 
through miles of solitude and across prairies 
scorched by a blazing sun or locked in the iron 
grasp of winter's desolation. Because of the liturgy 
of the church, it was not enough that the man who 
was a priest come to the settlers, but he must have 
with him all the sacred utensils for offering the sac- 
rifice of the Mass. It was necessary that he bring 
with him the altar stone, the chalice (which being 
of precious metal was the object for theives) the 
vestments and the linens. The strict laws of the 
church regarding the wine to be used and the un- 
leavened bread makes us realize how difficult it 
was for the priest to travel so equipped over the 
floods of rivers and over the trackless prairies. 
Then, too, there were language difficulties with the 
various emigrants from all parts of Europe. It is 
said that the early church spread the doctrine of 
Christ over the military roads of the Roman legions 
and a parallel is true in the history of the church 
in Illinois for it was not until the coming of the rail- 
roads do we find the settlements having anything 
like regular religious services. 



The parish in Porphetstown was part oi the 
Catholic Church in Tampico. When the John Mur- 
phy family moved to Prophetstown in 1875, they 
attended Mass in Tampico whenever they could. 
Mr. Murphy would rent or borrow (the records are 
not clear) a hand-car from the railroad and pump 
his way to church. The early records say that he 
look a "group of people along with his wife". May- 
be hand-cars were bigger in those days. At any 
rate the group would leave on Saturday night and 
remain with friends in Tampico, assist at Mass in 
the morning and return on Sunday afternoon. Ap- 
parently such zeal must have impressed the priest 
in Tampico, because later on we read that Mass 
was offered in the Murphy home on the first Sun- 
day of each month. We are sorry to relate that the 
pastor arrived by conventual railway coach. 

Mass was offered in the home of Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Leahy after the Murphy family moved from 
town to a farm. In 1916 the parish really began and 
there was regular attendance from Tampico. 

The present church was built during the time 
that Reverend Theodore McCormick served here. 
With the establishment of the parish as on indepen- 
dent spiritual family, a resident pastor was sent by 
Bishop Muldoon. 



THE ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH 




The Advent Christian people of Prophetstown 
were members of the Advent Christian Church at 
Mineral for many years. Due to the distance of 
twenty-five miles, they found it difficult to take a 
full part in the church program. Some were con- 
vinced that a church should be started in Prophets- 
town. Others were not so sure, but were willing to 
lend their support. 

After talking it over with Rev. William S. Bow- 
den, their pastor in Mineral, Rev. Howard Nason 
of Lancaster, Ohio, was contacted to hold an ev- 
angelistic campaign in Prophetstown. A large tent 




Mrs. Emily Adolf 



Congratulations 

To Our Prophetstown 

CENTENNIAL 



The Prophetstown Centennial should be one of the greatest 
boosts for our wonderful community . . if we all do our part. 
As a representative of the Daily Gazette, I am concerned 
with seeing that Prophetstown interests are well served, 
both in news coverage and, also to serve the business houses 
who want their messages to reach BEYOND the loco! area . . 
throughout the entire county and adjacent counties. 



DEAN HANSEN 
Contractor ,^ 



Prophetstown, 111. 






(i(^ "^ 



PHONE 4254 



was secured and a two weeks campaign was held 
in June, 1948. 

As a result of this campaign a church was or- 
ganized and Rev. Howard Nason became the first 
pastor in Sepember, 1948. 



The present structure and the adjoining six 
room parsonage were built by the members of the 
church. 

In addition to the Sunday School there is a 
King's Jewels organization, a Loyal Workers and 
the Woman's Home and Foreign Mission Society. 



LEON METHODIST CHURCH 



%- 



fittt 




came as our first regular minister and was here for 
3 years. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Howland were the 
first couple married in the Leon Chuch and were 
married by Rev. Graham. 

In 1898 plans were made to build a new and 
larger church. From a clipping from a Prophetstown 
paper of that year came this notice — "The Metho- 
dist Church society of Leon will erect a new church 
on a lot donated by Mr. George Reese, near where 
the present building stands. The cost of the new 
building will be $1500. Mr. Shaw and Mr. Sequine, 
who have just completed the new Leon School, will 
have the contract. Calvin Ott will do the mason 
work and the lumber will come from the J. E. Frary 
Lumber Co." 

The Epworth League members started the 
building fund by having a basket supper and 
earned $30. 



Leon Church history dates back more than 80 
years ago. A petition was circulated among the 
residents of Foytown and Bluff grade schools thai 
this community be called Leon. The name was 
suggested by Mrs. Orson Richards, an aunt of the 
late Otis Richards and the late Mrs. Frank How- 
land, from a village in New York state where Mrs. 
Richards had lived as a girl. The petition was sent 
to the gove rnment and the name was accepted. 
Since then our community has been called Leon oi 
Leon Comers. 

In 1880, a Mr. S. L. Ackley, who lived on the 
Clark Lane farm, gave a piece of land adjoining 
the cemetery, suggesting that cemetery lots be sole 
and with the money received a small church be 
built where all could worship. A building 24'x40' 
was built and people came from near and far foi 
worship, fun and entertainment as the church was 
nondenominational. It was known to all as the 
"Meeting House." 

The late Mrs. Frank Howland relates of the 
first service she attended. It was a New Year's 
Wartch Party in 1890. Later, ministers came from 
different churches and towns to preach and hold 
revival meetings. By this time, the community was 
being settled by many more people from the East- 
ern states and it was felt that a resident pastor 
was needed. Mr. Fred Graham, a student pastor, 



The work on the church was done all through 
the cold winter, stoves being set up as soon as the 
building was started. On February 5, 1899, with 
the temperatature registering 20 degrees below zero, 
the building was dedicated. The church was filled 
to capacity and before the morning ' service was 
over the remaining debt had been pledged. 

The women's organization of the church at 
this time was the W.C.T.U. but changed their name 
to the "Ladies' Aid Society", hoping to give more 
support to the church. Through the years, in order 
to meet church expenses, these ladies have baked 
hundreds of cakes, hundreds of pies, scores of 
chicken-pie dinners have been served and countr 
less number of ice cream socials have been held. 

In 1904, the parsonage was built to house the 
minister and his family. 

There have been many outstanding services. 
One was the 40th anniversary in 1939 when Rev. 
Graham, our first minister, was here. Another 
memorable event was in 1940 when the church 
was completely redecorated. Another homecoming 
event was the rededicating of our church as "Lecn, 
the church by the side of the Road." The late Dr. 
John Holland of W.L.S. was the speaker. 

In 1958, construction was started on a ney 
addition to the church. Consecration day for ihis 
new addition was on April 26, 1959 with the presen! 
pastor. Rev. Henry Holverson in charge. 



CONGRATULATIONS 




WEBURG JEWELRY 

Watches - Jewelry 
Diamonds 
Silverware 

PHONE 3391 



HARLEY CHURCH 



LIVESTOCK HAULING 

AND 

CORN SHELLING & HAULING 



PROMPT DEPENDABLE SERVICE 



Phone 3481 - Prophetstown 



'^-■"■~^ 




BE SURE - WITH PURE 

PUROL SERVICE STATION 



DIAL 2561 

for 



Any Kind of Automotive Service 



Tires - Tubes 



Batteries 



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Tuneups & Waxing * \ 



EDDIE LINDSKOG 



GENERAL AUCTIONEER 



"Service - Ability - Honesty" 



PHONE 5078 



Prophetstown, III. 



Our Schools Also Progress 



Wherever a few families settled in the early 
days, a schoolroom was usually set up in a room 
of one of the cabins. 

The "Spelling Bee" was one of the favorite 
activities for both parents and scholars. Many eve- 
nings were spent in such contests, usually with 
patrons trying their luck against the scholars of the 
school. 

The singing school was a "Homespun Institu- 
tion" and was very popular during the years from 
1835 to the early 1900's. The singing master trav- 
eled throughout an area conducting singing les- 
sons. Children and adults alike looked forward to 
his visits. 

Patterns blend and years flow, and the cross 
currents are many but the the undercurrent is 
strong that channels the stream of man along the 
way it must follow to achieve the aspired, "Light" 
of success through knowledge. 

The first school of instruction in this tov/nship 
as well as in Whiteside County, was held in Asa 
Crook's home in the fall of 1835. It was taught by 
Miss Lovica Hamilton of nearby Lyndon. She was 
th3 first teacher in Whiteside County. 

Lovica Hamilton was born in Northhampton, 
Mass., in 1818. She came to Illinois with her parents 



in 1835. They settled in Lyndon township after mak- 
ing the 1000 mile trip from New York by teams and 
wagons in thirty days. 

Miss Hamilton must be recognized as a pioneer 
educator in the county. It was because of the efforts 
of individuals like Lovica Hamilton and her con- 
temporaries, humble though their beginnings were, 
ihat education in Whitside County dates almost 
from the arrival of th3 first white settler. 

The first public school in the township was a 
log structure built by William Hill in 1836 on Wash- 
ington Street Road near his home. Since Washing- 




We're all in our places 




Aerial View of the High School 



Jlrsi Com§rcg.alloital Ci)airc1^ 



£. ^. Soa^sr^. !B.^. ^\{.^.. Cfiairmcin of Board of 'Druiiss^ 




FAITH — "We believe in God the Father, Infi- 
nite in wisdom, goodness and love; and 
in Jesus Christ, His Son, our Lord and 
Savior, who for us and our salvation lived 
and died and rose again and liveth ever- 
more: and in the Holy Spirit, who taketh 
of the things of Christ and revealeth them 
to us, renewing, comforting, and inspir- 
ing the souls of men. We are united in 
striving to know the will of God as taught 
us in the Holy Scriptures, and in our pur- 
pose to walk in the ways of the Lord 
made known or to be made known to us. 
We hold it to be the mission of the Church 
of Christ to proclaim the gospel to all 
mankind, exalting the worship of the one 
true God, and laboring for the progress 
of knowledge, the promotion of justice, 
the reign of peace, and the realization of 
human brotherhood. Depending, as did 
our fathers upon the continued guidance 
of the Holy Spirit to lead us into truth, 
we work and pray for the transformation 
of the world mto the kingdom of God; 
and we look with faith for the triumph of 
righteousness and the life everlasting. 



PRINCIPLES — We believe in a free Kingdom 
of God under the sole authority and 
leadership of the Spirit of Christ, insuring 
freedom of the individual soul, liberty of 
conscience, the independence of the local 
church and the free fellowship of the 
churches. 

IDEALS — Democratic life and organization, 
simplicity and vitality of faith, intellec- 
tual freedom, educational efficency, evan- 
gelistic purpose, missionary zeal, social 
passion, unsectarian fellowship, unselfish 
devotion to the extension of the Kingdom. 



PRACTICE — Congregational Churches empha- 
size beliefs in vi'hich all evangelical 
Christians agree, exalt nothing trivial or 
sectarian, repudiate dogmatism and all 
legislative control, ecclesiastical or civic, 
of the spiritual life, and seek union of all 
churches, on the basis of mutual freedom 
and fellowship. Our rule of action is "In 
essentials unity, in non-essentials liberty, 
in all things charity." 





»&»«< 







New Prophetstown Elementary School, Erected in 1951 



ton Street Road was an area settled first, there was 
a great need for a school. The log school was re- 
placed in 1840 at it's original location in the town- 
ship. 

The present Benton Street school, located on 
Benton Street, is the only remaining one-room 
school in the township. It includes somewhat the 
same territory as did that first log school. Since 
those early days, school districts have been estab- 
lished. Long before schools bore names, they were 
identfied with numerals. 

The first frame school building in the village of 
Prophetstown was completed in 1841 and was lo- 
cated on the river bank on Ferry Street. 

A brick building was built on West 2nd Street 
in the early 1850's near the present MoUie Perrin 
and Harry Hammond residences. It was built for 
the benefit of elementary children who wished to 
further their education. In fun this school was re- 
ferred to as the "College". 

An octagon-shaped school building was fin- 
ished in 1860. It was located on the hill near the 
site of the city water tower. It was taught and fin- 
anced by Mark Averill, a Quaker, and was called 
the Averill school or academy. 

A new two story, four room, brick school was 
built on the location of the present elementary 
school in 1881. Eleven grades were taught. The 
ninth, tenth and eleventh grades were in the fourth 
room or high school. An addition of two rooms was 
built in 1891 and one more grade was added to the 
high school. 

Two more rooms were built on the west side in 
1908. At that time both outdoor toilets were removed 
and new ones were installed in the basement of 
the original building. 

The board of education decided to present a 
bond issue to be voted on by the citizens, for the 
building of a new high school. It was passed and 
the school was ready for use in the fall of 1928. 

Both the grade and high school were in the 



same district, known as District Number 75. The 
high school became Prophetstown Community High 
School including a part of Henry county and parts 
of Tampico, Hume and Portland Townships, the 
assessed valuation being two million dollars. 

Since District Number 75 still owned the high 
school, the latter was rented from the former for 
three years for the sum of $3,500 per year. When the 
new elementary school was to be built, the high 
school was sold to District Number 308 (the Com- 
munity High School) for $60,000. 

A large addition to the high school was finished 
in 1958. The present staff includes the principal, a 
secretary, thirteen teachers, two custodians, two 
cooks, and two bus drivers. The enrollment is now 
about one hundred ninety. 

The old elementary school was condemned in 
1933, but, that being a time of great financial de- 
pression, nothing could be done about it. 

However, the present elementary school was 
erected in 1951. Then in 1955 five more classrooms 
were added to the west end. On April 11, 1959, the 
citizens passed a $60,000 bond issue to enlarge it 
again by adding three rooms to the east end. 

The present elementary school staff includes 
the principal, sixteen teachers, a secretary, two 
custodians, two cooks and a bus driver. The present 
enrollment is about three hundred fifty-five. 

Within the last five and one-half years threg 
new consolidated schools have been built in thg 
'ncinity of Prophetstown. 

The Centerville Consolidated school. District 
Number 77, in Leon Community was completed and 
ready for use in Febraury of 1954. Three teachers 
are employed there. 

Portland Consolidated School, District Number 
146, in Portland township was opened for classes in 
September, 1954. It also employs three teachers. 

Crestview Consolidated School, District 148, is 
in Hume township on Route 172. It was com- 
pleted in 1958 with a teaching statt ot two. 



THICKSTEN'S 
POP CORN SHOP 

Quality Pop Corn for 
Half A Century. 



Mr. & Mrs. Earl Thicksten 



1llrfl|» 





Prepare Now for 

Prophetstown's 2nd Centennial 

by Investing in a 

COUNTRY LIFE 

Retirement Policy 
CRAIG FINNICUM 



CONGRATULATIONS FROM 

ERIE STATE 



ERIE ■ - - ILLINOIS 
OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES 

Earl L. Scott President 

J. R. Roberts Vice President 

C. A. Brumbaugh Cashier 

Jennie Gammon Assistant Cashier 

Mary Mix Bookkeeper 

DIRECTORS 

Keith Bare 
Howard Barkman 
Charles W. Brown 
Sam Hoerler 
Emery Pfundstein 
Earl L. Scott 
J. R. Roberts 




Waites Barber Shop 



We'll Look for You 



And You Look for Us 




Remains After Congregational Church Fire 





First Methodist Parsonage 



Congregational Church Choir 






~w^' 



Cenlerville School, District Number 77 




First Methodist Church in Prophetstown 








This back house on West 3rd Street is one of 
the oldest remaining buildings in Prophetstown. It 
is considered to be at least one hundred nine years 
old. It was built by A. J. Warner and is now owned 
and occupied by Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Lindsay. 




First High School Graduating Class 1886 
Front Row 1 to r Allen Greene, John Q. Pad- 
dock, Charles W. Fenn. 

Back Row Mary Barnes, Allie McNomara, 
Maggie Sandersen, Annie Cleavland. 
Prin. William J. Johnson 




The old Grade School Building 




Benton Street School, District 76 



-f—j— I T" 

1 i ! ; ' 
■5&£iii^nBi*.,BiMifiai^Hait^«.l ^i 




rmm 



'• " i«ffiii«"'ti««ia*»^^.i*>^^«*fc«^..^»yilll^ 



!;' IgJ-'m^MSBgr 




Portland Consolidated School, District 14G 




Crest View School, District 148 



Congratulations to Prophetstown 




PERKINS PLUMBING & HEATING 



LARRY BLACKER! 

DON HILL 
ALBERT LUCHMAN 



DAVE LANPHERE 

BILL WALDBUSSER 

GEORGE PERKINS 

RICK PERKINS 



Organizations Build Thriving Community 



We sketch noJP some of the patriotic, fraternal 
and charitable orgamzaiions of Prophetstown. 
To build a cii^ only rvood and stone is needed. 
Much more is required to build a communitv. 
The unselfish mark of these groups has enriched 
the vierv for all of us. 




The Prophetstown Woman's Club 

Prophetstown women through their organiza- 
tions play an important part in the social and civic 
life of the community. Their aim is to promote educa- 
tional, social and patriotic influence for the welfare 
of all people. The study of fine arts, including mus- 
ic and painting, has a place on the program. 

The Woman's Club is an outgrowth of a dom- 
estic science club, which later became known as 
the Thursday Club. The original club was organ- 
ized by the late Mrs. G. G. Thompson, assisted by 
the wife of Senator Dunlap, at a meeting held in 
the GAR hall in 1906. 

On February 12, 1910, the name was changed 
to the Thursday Club. Its first civic work was the 
improvement of Riverside Cemetery. For this the 
club borrowed money to defray expenses. Weeds 
were mowed, gravestones straightened, gravel 
drives put in, and finally a curbing was placed on 
the outside of the grounds. 

The club next turned its attention to improving 
the park and riverfront. Weeds were cleared and 
grass mowed as far as Coon Creek. The band stand 
v/as painted. Tables, benches and a range were 
purchased for use in the park. The money for this 
project was raised by popular subscription. 

The club members signed a petition asking the 
railroad to place a bell at the crossing. This request 
was granted. Playground equipment was needed 
at the school. Basketball equipment, teeter boards, 
and slides were purchased. Five "Go Slow" signs 
were placed at different streets in the vicinity of 
the school. 

On April 16, 1914, the club joined the district 
federation and two years later joined the state fed- 
eration. On March 29, 1917, the name was changed 
to the Woman's Club of Prophetstown. The club 



motto is "We do things — work, not words, counts." 
During the World War, meetings were suspended 
and members spent much of their time doing Red 
Cross work, aiding in the sale of Christmas seals. 
Near East relief, and Salvation Army work. 

The club has given assistance to various char- 
itable organizations including child welfare work, 
Bethlehem's Day Nursery in Chicago, besides giv- 
ing liberally to the needy in its own community. It 
has given valuable support to institutions for 
wounded soldiers. It has helped maintain the Park 
?iidge home for girls and has sent money and cloth- 
ing to the Woman's Shelter. In April, 1929, the club 
assisted the city in the purchase of a new fire hose, 
contributing $160. 

In September, 1929, the club moved from the 
club room in the city hall, where it had met for 
years, to the Adams Memorial Library. The first 
meeting there was held September 12 and it con- 
iinu?s to have meetings there. The Americana was 
purchased and presented to the library as a con- 
tribution from the club. The club's next big project 
was the landscaping and beautifying the Highway 
Triangle Park. With the co-operation of the city, 
state and public spirited citizens, a spot was devel- 
oped that attracts the eye of everyone entering the 
city. 

The Prophetstown Woman's Club celebrated 
its 3Gth anniversary on Thursday, October 1, 1936, 
with an appropriate program, tea at the club rooms 
and a memorial service for departed members. 

The Garden Club is part of the Woman's Club 
organization and the meetings are held in the 
homes of the members. They are planning the per- 
mansnt flower baskets to be placed on the new 
street light poles, as soon as possible, and hope to 
have this project completed in time for the centen- 
nial this summer. 



COMPLIMENTS 

TO 

PROPHETSTOWN 

ON ITS 

lOOTH ANNIVERSARY 

APPLIANCE CONTROL DEPARTMENT 
Progress Is Our Most Important Product 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 

MORRISON, ILLINOIS 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO 

PROPHETSTOWN 

ON ITS 

100TH BIRTHDAY 

ROCK FALLS 
NATIONAL BANK 

ROCK FALLS, ILLINOIS 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



CONGRATULATIONS 

PROPHETSTOWN 

ON YOUR CENTENNIAL 



FULTON, ILLINOIS 



Member Federal Reserve Bank 



Member F. D. I. C. 



Prophefstown and Community 

With the Memorable 

100 Years of the Past Come 

Our Wishes for Great Things 

for The Future. 

SINCE 1937 

A Bright Spot 
in A Fine Community. 



Marches! Bros. 



i^^TTTini, 



-Theatre 



Violet & Vesta Vittitow 



Order of the Eastern Star 

In the year 1870 several members of the Mas- 
onic Lodge and their wives decided that they would 
like to have an Order of the Eastern Star Chapter 
in Prophetstown. On August 25th of that year the 
chapter was instituted as Minerva Chapter No. 23, 
and granted a charter with the following serving 
as the first officers: Sarah Sears, Worthy Matron, 
W. R. Kent, Worthy Patron, Maria Monroe, Assoc- 
iate Matron, J. C. Paddock, Secretary, Minerva Mc 
Kenzie, Treasurer, Jennie Brigham, Conductress 
Gertrude Cleaveland, Associate Conductress, M. E 
Paddock, Secretary, Minerva Paddock, Warden and 
W. E. Brigham, Warden. 

The first meeting was held September 17, 18- 
70, in the old Masonic Hall on Third Street. This 
building is still standing. It is owned by Mrs. Gus 
Hawkinson and used as a residence. 

In the year of 1874 some of the members of 
Minerva Chapter assisted in instituting a Grand 
Chapter in Illinois. 

At the meeting of the Grand Chapter in 1877, 
the chapters of the state of Illinois were renum- 
bered as several of the first chapters had surrend- 
ered their charters and some were combined so 
that Mineva Chapter was renumbered No. 6. 

At the meeting on Febraury 14, 1880, the Wor 
thy Grand Patron was present and announced that 
the people of Erie were desirous of instituting a 
chapter and wished a recommendation from Min- 
erva Chapter. This request was granted and sev- 
eral members went to Erie a few days later and 
Evangeline Chapter was instituted. 

The Chapter had a picnic in observance of its 
twenty-fifth anniversary on August 26, 1895, at the 
home of Sister Minerva and Brother Crosby Mc- 
Kenzie. The chapter was named in honor of Sister 
Minerva McKenzie. 

At the meeting of June 13, 1896, a communica- 
tion was read inviting the officers to be present at 
the Insitution of Sterling Chapter. On August 8, 
1896, it was decided to go to Fulton to institute Mer- 
ton Chapter and on November 17, 1896, it helped 
Rock River Chapter of Lyndon to organize. 

In 1920 it celebrated its Fiftieth Anniversary 
with a picnic in Riverside Park at which time four 
of the charter members were present. 

In the spring of 1920 the chapter moved to 
the new Masonic Temple on Washington Street 
where the meetings are still held. 

In 1945 the seventy-fifth anniversary was cele- 
brated by having a banquet at the Methodist 
Church preceeding the meeting. The Worthy Grand 
Matron, Worthy Grand Patron, other Grand Officers 
and distinguished guests were present, as well as 



'ifteen Past Matrons and four Pasi Patrons of Min- 
erva Chapter. 

In 1958 Rock River Chapter of Lyndon gave up 
their charter and twenty-seven of the members affil- 
iated with Minerva Chapter. 

At the present time Minerva Chapter has two- 
hundred twenty-five members. Special mention is 
due the members who have belonged for over fifty 
years. They are Lucetta Swederus and Guy Cleave- 
land having joined in 1896, Blanche McGrady in 
1898, Rhonda M. Hotchkiss in 1900, and Kathryn 
Hudson In 1905. 



Prophetstown Women's Relief Corps 

Women's Relief Corps, an auxiliary of the GAR 
was named after John A. Parrott, a Prophetstown 
soldier who was killed in the Battle of Resecka in 
Georgia May 16, 1864. Prior to the war Mr. Par- 
rott was a local building contractor. He enlisted in 
the Illinois Regiment No. 34 and received his train- 
ing at Camp Butler in Springfield. He helped re- 
cruit men for voluntary enlistment for Prophets- 
town Company B. Lt. Parrott was promoted to the 
rank of Captain after being wounded in the Bottle 
of Shiloh. After his death David Cleaveland, an- 
other Prophetstown man was promoted to fill the 
captaincy. The Prophetstown corps was organized 
and received its charter in 1883. There were 
thirty-eight charter members. 

For the first thirteen years the meetings were 
held in the Odd Fellows Hall. In 1895 plans were 
made and a GAR Hall was built. On April 29, 
1896, John A. Parrott Post and Woman's Relief 
Corps Memorial Association were incorporated so 
that they could take possession of Memorial Hall 
and own the building and real estate. The deed 
was executed June 30, 1896. On June 14, 1897, a lot 
was purchased from the Prophetstown Cemetery 
Association and a monument in honor of the tm- 
known soldiers was erected. 

The Women's Relief Corps met twice a month 
for the purpose of transacting business. They sup- 
ported all patriotic and philanthropic projects in the 
community and helped in the commemoration of 
Memorial Day. 

Due to a dwindling membership and other un- 
foreseen circumstances causing increasing hard- 
ship of upkeep, an agreement was made with 
American Legion Post No. 522. The post was to 
maintain the building and the WRC and Sons of 
Veterans were to hcrve use of the building as a 
meeting place as long as needed. This agreement 
took place March 8, 1952. 

On January 2, 1957, it was voted to dissolve 
the corporation of John A. Parrott Post and Womcrrs 
Relief Corps No. 97. At the present time there are 
thirty-three members. 



Some Prophetstown Firsts 



FIRST SETTLERS: the Winnebagos Indians - 
their village was burned in 1832 by our 
militia headed by Abraham Lincoln. 

FIRST WHITE SETTLERS: the Asa Crook fami- 
ly - arrived June 4, 1834. 

FIRST SCHOOL & FIRST CHURCH SERVICES 
0835^ & FIRST POSTOFFICE (1836) ail 
conducted in the Asa Crook home. 

FIRST ELECTION in August, 1835 (town 
platted in 1838 & incorporated in 1859) 
Prophetstown was named for the great 
prophet and soothsayer, Wa-bo-Kies- 
Shiek, Chief of the Winnebagoes who 
counseled Blackhawk not to attack the 
the white man. 

FIRST FRATERNAL OR- 
GANIZATION: started 
in 1858. 




FIRST HOTEL: the Rock River House in 1841. 

FIRST BRICK BUILDING: erected in 1854. 

FIRST CHURCH: erected in 1864. 

FIRST RAILROAD: the C B & Q constructed 
in 1871. 

FIRST NEWSPAPER: the Prophetstown Spike 
in 1871. 

FIRST BANK: organized in 1872. 

FIRST WATERWORKS: 1904. 

FIRST TELEPHONE: Chartered in 1904. 

FIRST ELECTRIC POWER: 1896, Wm. McNeil. 
Sold to Roy Olmstead & Chas Lancaster 
in 1900. 



(j Public Service Company 



Vy-Tab-0-Lator 
Conditioners 



AND 



Thrif-T-Mix 
Concentrates 



"irS THE FINISH THAT COUNTS" 

''Ask The Man Who Feeds \\" 



PHONE PROPHETSTOWN 

4751 5384 

A. V. Skarin Forrest Under 



The Prophetstown Lions Club 



Country Club 



The Prophetstown Lions Club is a men's civic 
service organization of recent origin. It was char- 
tered on December 11, 1947, at the Prophetstown 
High School. It was co-sponsored by the Sterling 
and Morrison Lions Clubs. 

At the time of the charter there were fifty-six 
members who met, ate, and worked together to es- 
tablish the club on a firm foundation. This organi- 
zation's continual growth through enterprising ac- 
complishments, is in evidence today. 

It has raised money to help the city develop- 
ment, as well as to help many deserving individ- 
uals in times of emergency. 

Some of the noteworthy donations to other 
community organizations and individuals are as 
follows: in 1959, a sum of $956.06 to the Community 
Fire Department to help purchase a radio system 
in its fire trucks; a fourteen foot rescue boat and 
trailer to the Fire Department in 1958; the Blood 
Donors List which was started and maintained since 
April 13, 1948, for the use of the local medical doc- 
tors; a donation of $304.45 to the Band Parents As- 
sociation to be used in the purchase of band uni- 
forms; glasses for the needy; in 1955, for the bene- 
fit of about 800 children a Lion and Tiger Show in 
the grade school gymnasium; in 1956 a "seeing eye 
dog" to a blind couple who lived in our town at that 
time; Christmas baskets to shut-ins; to scouting 
groups; to the city rest room fund and many more, 
too numerous to mention. 

The formal opening of the present club rooms 
was held in Febroury, 1951. There have been reg- 
ular weekly, Tuesday noon dinner meetings since 
that time. 

The Lions Club was one of th? co-operating 
organizations to encourage "Dollar Days", as far 
back as 1948. At various times the club has pro- 
moted city-wide clean-up programs. For many 
years it has had a food concession on Kids' Day". 
During 1955-1956 the Lions sponsored the State 
Softball Tournament at the local ball diamond. 

On March 5, 1957, our present state represent- 
ative, Hon. George Brydia and Mrs. Brydia were 
the donors of a two-story business house at 314 
Washington Street to the Lions Club. A bronze 
plaque is attached to this building in memorium 
of their most generous gift. 

The Prophetstown Lions were co-sponsors with 
the Sterling Club in 1958 in establishing a new 
Lions Club in Tampico, which is an active, grow- 
ing organization. 



On one of the first days of lime, 1910, the pat- 
rons and neighbors of the Centerville School, most- 
ly women, gathered with the children for the clos- 
ing day exercises. Many of these women were not 
well acquainted as there was nothing to call them 
together except, occasionally, something at the 
school house. After the exercises, a suggestion was 
made that a club would be a splended thing for the 
neighborhood. The suggestion met with hearty ap- 
proval. 

A group of women met on June 10, 1910. Four- 
teen women joined the club. They drew up their 
constitution and by-laws. Mrs. George Yager was 
the first president; Mrs. William Clark, vice-presi- 
dent; Mrs. Robert Pritchard, secretary, and Mrs. 
William Pritchard, treasurer. 

The members voted to call the organization 
"The Country Club". The membership at present 
is fourteen. Mrs. George Yager is the only re- 
maining charter member. 

At first the members seemed more interested 
in domestic science and current events. Back as 
far as 1913 the members of this small club were 
packing boxes for the Mt. Carmel Orphanage near 
Morrison. During the World War in 1918 the mem- 
bers sewed on Red Cross work. 

On December 9, 1920, Mrs. S. B. Bayles was 
elected as the club's first delegate to meet with the 
Prophetstown Rest Room committee. The club has 
continuously helped towards the maintenance of 
the rest room. 

The club women have always assisted and 
helped with many worthy causes. The motto is: 
"If you want a good neighbor, be one". The colors 
are orchid and green and the flower is the sweet- 
pea. 

The Country Club federated with the county, 
district and state federation of women's clubs in 
1935. In 1940 they voted to withdraw from the fed- 
eration. 

The Country Club was the first club of rural 
women in Prophetstown Township and is the old- 
est club around, still functioning under the original 
name. Members meet once a month in the homes 
of members for a social time, and also contribute 
to the Rest Room Fund and other worthy causes 
such as the cancer and polio drives 

The 25th anniversary was celebrated in June, 
1935, at the home of Mrs. George Yager where the 
first meeting was held. Many former members at- 
tended. 




ipS^A BOY CAN 
FEED 70 HEAD 



IN 10 MINUTES 

YOUR LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE 
OF 

P & D SILO UNLOADER 



Phone 6107 



Prophetstown 



FARMERS 

This year use the fertilierz that give you, your 
soil and your crops every advantage. 



FOR YOU 

Free flowing, Non-caking 
In bags - in bulk 

FOR YOUR SOIL 

Builds Fertility 
Maintains Fertility 



SOILJUILDERS^ FOR YOUR CROP 

Food for Growth 




OiBiiitGicoMMirr 



Food for Yield 
Food for Quality 



Sold by: 



PHONE 5492 



PROPHETSTOWN 



Stiyf^oW' 



MADISON 
SILO 

The few summer months in 
the height of the silo building 
season cuts the time short 
for delivery of the materials 
that make up Madison High 
Quality Silos. Road bans in 
the spring hinder delivery 
of silos. Madison Silo Com- 
pany has an attractive early 
delivery sales plan that will 
save you dollars and assure 
building your silo in ample 



Buy with Confidence, For prompt 
courteous attention write or call; 



FRED SANDROCK 




PHONE 5492 



PROPHETSTOWN 



IT'S TIME YOU FED 



SWEET LASSY 



SWEET LASSY CATTLE SUPPLEMENT 



FRED SANDROCK 



PHONE 5492 



PROPHETSTOWN 



The Masons 

The history of Masonary in our community has 
paralleled the entire history of Prophetstown since 
Prophetstown Lodge No. 293 A. F. & A. M. was 
chartered by the Grand Lodge of Illinois on Oc- 
tober 5, 1859. Charter members were William T. 
Minchen, Andrew I. Grover, Simeon Fuller, William 
Pratt, David H. Nichols, William A. Spencer, Frank- 
lin Hadaway, James C. Monroe and H. A. Park- 
hurst. William T. Minchen was the first Worshipful 
Master. 

After the lodge was organized, it held its meet- 
ings, for several years, in a building on the stie of 
the GAR building now occupied by the American 
Legion and Sons of Veterans. In 1868, it was decid- 
ed to build a Masonic Temple and on September 1 1 
of that year a contract for its erection was author- 
ized. On December 10, 1868, the building was form- 
ally dedicated. The building still stands on the 
southside of East Second Street just east of H & L 
Produce Company. As the fraternity grew, so did 
the need for better and larger housing. On May 6, 
1919, a decision was made to build a new tem.ple 
and a joint committee of members of Prophetstown 
Lodge No. 293 AF & AM and Prophetstown Chap- 
ter No. 174 RAM was authorized to contract for and 
erect the building. 

The building was completed and dedicated on 
April 29, 1920. This is the temple presently used by 
the lodge. 

While many members have been Masons for 
twenty, thirty and forty years, we are honored to 
have and give recognition to these men who have 
been members of the fraternity for 50 years or 
longer: Mark A. Stowell, Guy Cleveland, Chas. 
Cleveland and Harvey Hull. 

Prophetstown Lodge No. 293 A. F. & A. M. is 
pleased to have played a part in the community 
life of Prophetstown during the past 100 years. We 
look to the future with hope and trust for a peaceful 
world and a continuative period of growth and 
prosperity for all. 

So mote it be. 



Royal Neighbors of America 

Prophetstown Camp No. 516, Royal Neighbors 
of America received its charter on February 24, 
!c97, with twenty charter members. 

The camp's first meeting place was in the hall 
on Washington Street, in the building now owned 
by the Public Service Company. In 1933, after sev- 
eral moves, it convened in the Lion's Club Room in 
the city hall, where it continues to have its meet- 
ings. 



Business meetings are held the second Mon- 
day evening of the month. A social meeting is held 
each month in homes of the members. 

The membership of the Prophetstown camp has 
grown from twenty members to sixty-two beneficial 
members, twenty-seven social members and sev- 
enteen juvenile members. At this time the insur- 
ance in force amounts to $83,570. 

Since 1951 they have conducted a refreshment 
stand on Kid's Day to raise money, this being the 
only money making project of the year. On Mem- 
orial Day a marker is placed on the graves of all 
deceased members. 

Royal Neighbors of America is a secret frater- 
nal organization having it's headquarters in Rock 
Island, Illinois. It sells life insurar ;e to people who 
have been recommended by ' i member of the 
camp. Women who do not desire to have insurance 
may join as a social member. 



The Jolly Neighbors 

A group of women attending a "last day of 
school" picnic in the Prairieview District decided to 
organize a club. An organization meeting was held 
on May 20, 1917. Eight women were present at this 
meeting and the following were elected to serve as 
officers: Mrs. Harry Lawrence, president, Mrs. H. 
B. Lyon, vice-president, and Mrs. Arthur Glass, sec- 
retary and treasurer. 

The name of the club is "The Jolly Neighbors" 
and the motto is "If you want a friend, be one". 
The colors are blue and gold and the flower is the 
violet. At one time there were fifty members. In 
1918 the club organized as a domestic science club 
and adopted a constitution and by-laws. Programs 
of food demonstrations, lessons in cooking and 
health were given at each meeting. The club also 
served dinners, sale lunches, pieced quilts, tied 
comforters, sewed carpet rags and held home 
made ice cream socials. The fourth of July was 
always celebrated with a big family picnic in 
. Cabots Grove. 

In 1919 this, with other clubs, was instrumental 
in establishing the Ladies Rest Room for our town. 
It has continued to support the Rest Room fund 
through the years. 

In 1920 the club joined the District Federation 
of Women's Clubs. In 1927 it joined the state fed- 
eration but when the group became too small to 
support both the federation projects and those of 
the community it withdrew from the federation. 

fn 1957 the club celebrated its fortieth anniver- 
sary with nineteen past members among those 
present. Mrs. H. B. Lyon has had a continuing 
membership in the club. 




EGION LANES 



Owned and Operated by 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 522 

First in Northwestern Illinois to Install Automatic Pinspotters— in 1955 



BOWL WHERE YOU SEE I 




"MAGlC^aS^TRlANGLE" 
AMF AUTOMAtTc PINSPOTTERS 




AMF PINSPOTTERS INC. 

Subsidiary of 
AMERICAN MACHINE & FOUNDRY COMPANY 

6500 North Lincoln Avenue 



CHICAGO 45, ILLINOIS 



ORchard 4-1600 



The WaTanYe Club 

The word "Wa Tan Ye" is of Indian origin and 
signifies "Foremost". The club motto is "Service 
Foremost". The colors of this association and of the 
chartered clubs are red, black and yellow, chosen 
because they dominate the color of Indian art. Red 
is warmth, love and courage; yellow is the Indian 
spiritual color; black is the essence of all colors or 
all that is best in the human relationships. The 
club flower is the daisy. It signifies one having 
high and admirable characteristics. It recalls the 
broad fields over which the Indians roamed in yes- 
teryear. 

Wa Tan Ye is a service organization com- 
posed of business and professional women of the 
community. Two members from each business or 
profession are admitteed. The Prophetstown Club 
was organized by the Morrison Club in 1956, and 
a charter was granted on April 28, 1956, when a 
banquet and meeting was held at the Prophets- 
town Grade School gymnasium. The twenty-one 
members were initiated by the Morrison Club and 
the first club officers were installed as follows: 
Marilyn Siefken, president; Arlene DeWeerdt, vice- 
president; Marie Rodee, secretary; Marilyn Lan- 
phere, treasurer, and Edna Johnson, parliamentar- 
ian. 

The club meets the second and fourth Tues- 
days of each month at the Coffee Shop with a 6:30 
dinner preceeding the business meeting. In the 
summer months picnics have been held in the Pro- 
phetstown park. The Christmas meetings have been 
parties in the homes of members. The organization 
assists in all civic projects, such as, serving as 
matrons at the various service stations on "Kid's 
Day", assists in various ways when th9 Bloodmo- 
bile is in Prophetstown, sponsors a Girl Scout troop, 
donates to all worthy causes, furnished gradua- 
tion clothes for a deserving boy, and at Christmas 
lime remembers shut-ins and needy families. 

The Prophetstown Wa Tan Ye Club has a mem- 
bsrship of twenty members at this time. 



The American Legion Auxiliary 

The American Legion Auxiliary of Prophets- 
town Post No. 522 held its organization meeting on 
April 19, 1922. The temporary charter was applied 
for in May, 1922, with nineteen members. 

Thirty-two members were gained during the 
first sixty days. Application for a permanent char- 
ter was received December 1, 1922. During the first 
(our months meetings were held only upon the 
call of the acting president. Permanent officers were 
elected in September as follows: Phyllis Thede, 
president, Leona Sommers, secretary, Cora Glass, 
treasurer, Florence Mosher, historian, Delia Thomp- 
son, hospital chairman, and Bessie Burdsall, chap- 
lain. There were sixty-five charter members. 



The American Legion Auxiliary entertained a."' 
a tea April 23, 1957, in the Legion Hall honoring 
the charter members of the unit. A memorial was 
conducted for all deceased members. 

The Auxiliary donates money to the Depart- 
ment Child Welfare program and sponsors a cot- 
tage at Illinois Soldiers & Sailors Home at Normal. 
It donates to the Salvation Army, Crusade for Free- 
dom, TB Sales, Heart Fund, March of Dimes, Can- 
cer, Red Cross and Illinois Society of Mental 
Health. Members work at the Morriosn Hospital. 
The organization sends a girl to Girl's State at 
Jacksonville each year. A $200 nurse's scholarship 
has been granted to a local veteran's daughter. 

The four Gold Star Mothers are Mrs. Josie Ac- 
keberg, Mrs. Mildred Tyler, Mrs. Myrtle Sawyer 
and Mrs. Louis Hannabarger. 

In 1922 the quota for poppies was 500. Last 
year it was 1700. The proceeds were used by ths 
unit for re-habilitation and child welfare projects. 
Re-habilitation is the Auxiliary's biggest project 
which includes a nine-point program. 

Tray favors are sent to a hospital each month 
with cigarettes attached. The unit sponsors an 
American essay contest among the schools each 
year. Yearly the Legion's birthday is observed 
with a picnic supper followed by a program. March 
26, 1959, was its fortieth anniversary. 



The Prophetstown Boosters 

The Prophetstown Boosters, organized in 1927, 
has been one of the community's most influential 
groups. Its organization has been copied by a num- 
ber of cities in Illinois. 

Although the Boosters are perhaps best known 
for Kids' Day celebrations and, before that. Rooster 
Booster Days, their most beneficial contributions to 
Prophetstown have been activities not widely pub- 
licized. They have provided financial support for 
new business and industry, the State Park, and a 
multitude of other civic projects. 

Outstanding speakers on varied subjects and 
from all parts of the world have made their an- 
nual meeting, held in Febraury of each year, one 
of the city's highlights. The membership, open to 
everyone, elects at this meeting 15 members to 
conduct the affairs of the club. Its financial founda- 
tion is provided by contributions from local busi- 
ness men and women. 

This group was organized to meet the need of 
a commercial club, but its age and the high qual- 
ity of its leadership has gradually forced it to as- 
sume paternal responsibilities to the community. 
The club promotes the varied main street func- 
tions designed to stimulate business activity, but 
more important, it has sponsored or assisted the 
sponsor of every noteworthy public enterprise fox 
32 years. 



H. J. TABER & SON 






LESLIE KILBERG 


RIVERRUN GRAVEL 




PHONE 4441 - PROPHETSTOWK 


GENERAL CONTRACTING 


Starting - 32nd year 






Phone 2061 - Prophetstown 


"Bill" Taber, Mgr. 




EARL BEEBE 


HULTING'S HYBRID SEEDS 




SEED CORN - GRASS SEED 


TRUCKER 






Arthur Fotzler John Sippel 


Limestone - Gravel 


Phone 104R10 Tampico Phone 3361 


Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt 






LEONARD MARCY 


Phone 4856 Prophetstown 





The Tuesday Evening Club 

The Tuesday Evening Club is an out-growlh 
of the 'NFSA' (Not for Self Alone) Club, a sewing 
club organized by Helen Fassett Gentz in October, 
1936. 

The first officers were: president, Anna Ports; 
vice president, Helen Gentz; secretary, Margaret 
Lancaster; treasurer, Berniece Oppendike; reporter, 
Marian Rosenow; flowers and cards, Joyce Wag- 
enecht. 

On Sepi. 15, 1938, the NFSA Club reorganized 
by joining the Federation of Women's Clubs, 
^■nanging it s name to the Prophetstown Junior Wo- 
men's Club immediately becoming members of the 
County, District and State Federations. 

Mrs. V. R. Olmstead, junior arvisor from the 
Senior Womons Club, assisted in the drawing up 
of the constitution and by-laws of the newly or- 
qanizsd club, with the original club's name re- 
tained as a 'motto' for the new club. Colors chos- 
en we;9 pink and the flower, sweet pea. 

In April, 1952, the club changed it's name to 
Ihe Tuesday Evening Club because of age limit 
rules of the Federation and in July, 1953, withdrew 
its membership in the Federation. 

Since that time the Tuesday Evening Club has 
sponsored Brownie Girl Scouts, made tea towels 
for the elementary school, helped to support the 
■City Rest Room, given gifts to the Round Grove 
l>iursing Home, purchased American Flags for an 
organization, given Christmas baskets each year 
and made substantial donations to the Cancer Fund, 
Polio drives, Christmas Seals and to families in 
need. 

Over the years, the membership has flucuated 
from eleven to thirty. 

The American Legion 

The Prophetstown American Legion Post was 
orir;inally formed on Febraury 2, 1920, at the 
Dreamland Theatre by a group of veterans of 
World War 1. The group of 29 men elected Dr. Stan- 
ley B. LaDue as temporary chairman, later made 
him their first commander, James B. Mosher was 
named temporary secretary, and later appointed 
first adjutant. 

A week later the group met with Rev. Wood- 
fin, pastor of the Congregational Church, who 
spoke to them of their post possibilities. William Set- 
liffe, state organizational officer from Rockford 
spoke on the proper procedure of organizing. At 
this meeting 58 men signed the charter and paid 
•'u9s for the year 1920. Officers elected, other than 
those previously mentioned, were Hiram O. War- 
n3r, vice commander; Elmer E. Johnson, finance of- 
ficer. 



Following World War II the veterans elected 
Joseph B. Reichard Sr. as commander of the post. 

Through loans made by Community residents, 
the Legion financed the construction of the bowling 
alley. Ground was broken on June 1, 1948, and the 
Legion Lanes were opened November 20, 1948. 

Automatic pinspotters were added in 1956, 
making the Legion Lanes one of the finest equipped 
bowling alkys in northwestern Illinois. 



In Memorium 

WAR OF 1812 

Riverside CemeterY 

John Brown 
N. G. Reynolds 
Jabez Warner 

Washington Street Cemetery 

Hiram UnderhiU 

Leon Cemetery 

Samuel G. Steadman 
William Stames 

MEXICAN WAR 

Riverside Cemetery 

H. T. Kellum 

Leon Cemetery 

Hylon Woodworth 

SPANISH - AMERICAN WAR 

Riverside Cemetery 

Henry W. Adams 
John C. Littell 
Leonard C. Middleton 
C. A. Pense 

CIVIL WAR 
Riversride Cemetery 

Henry Wm. Adams 
Drarper Angell 
S. G. Baldwin 
E. L. Ballou 
E .P. Beardslee 
J. D. Beardslee 
E. S. Bentley 
Wm. Blackmore 
Herman Bollen 
Albert Brace 
Wm. Bighorn 
Jonathan Brown 
Samuel L. Brown 
T. G. Bryant 
Chas. H. Burdsall 
John W .Clark 
Oscar Clark 
R. N. Clark 
Cyrus Cleaveland 



Socl^ltMRR. 



?oi"Pir,f." 




CADY IMPLEMENT CO. 

Yorktown, Illinois 
MASSEY-FERGUSON HARVESTER NEW IDEA 

P.O. TAMPICO, ILL. PHONE, TAMPICO 1 13R9 



Cady Implement & Grain 



Deer Grove, Illinois 



David Cleaveland 
Edward Cleveland 
Charles Colmon 
Edward Commer 
H. M. Dailey 
Morris Dorathy 
Henry Drain 
James E. Frory 
Oak man Gage 
B. R. Garrison 
Charles George 
E. R. Garrison 
Thomas Graham 
Marion Green 
John Halton 

B. F. Hill 
Frank Howard 
Harvey C. Hull 
J. W. Keefer 
John Keefer 
W. B. Littell 
Edward Lyon 
William Mathis 
J. A. Maxfield 
William McKenzie 

C, J. Merrill 
James Middleton 

John Moore (Confederate soldier'^ 

Thomas Mulcay 

Geo. F. Needham 

George Olmstead 

Wm. Peckham 

Christian Peterson 

George Potter 

C. O. Pratt 

Milton Isenberg (Conf.) 

William Reed 

John Reed 

John Reynolds 

Lyman Richards 

Gilbert Rogers 

John Rose 

John Sanderson 

Morton Sanderson 

A. F. Shaw 

George Shaw 

Washington Shearer 

Roswell Slater 

James Smith 

Phillip Smith 

Albert Spenser 

J. H. Starrett 

Jerry Stewart 

James Stowell 

Emmett Underbill 

George Warren 

Sondylown Cemetery 

Robert E. Adams 
Potter Benjamin 
Eugene Bessie 
Mark Bisbie 
Jonathan Brown 
Lyman Chase 



Charles Dorathy 
Erastus Fuller 
Milo Langdon 
Seth Langdon 
Carlos Martin 
Daniel McNaughton 
Dennis Mendall 
Wm. Norcott 
Geo. Ocoboch 
J. Delos Tiramerman 
John Toms 

Leon Csmelery 

John Hopkins 
Elias Kilmer 
Washington Burroughs 
William Lane 
William Lane 
Charles Lane 
Gardner Reynolds 
Edd Beebe 
Harrison Johnson 
Samuel Steadman 
John Mosier 
Gilbert Brimmer 
John Amos Ellsworth 
Leonard Richards 
Harvey Osborne 

Washington Street Cemetery 

Russell Chadwick 
Charles Gage 
Carlos Johnson 
Lyman Show 

WORLD WAR I 

Riverside Cemetery 

Adolph Anderson 
Arvid Anderson 
Harold Beeman 
Chas. H. Burdsall 
William Burdsall 
Richard Doty 
John Drummet 
Leslie Fadden 
Kenneth Gibson 
Harry E. Glass 
Harold Hodge 
Carl E. Johnson 
Robert Lanphere 
Ross Lanphere 
Stanley LaDue - 
John Littell 
Walter Marshall 
Frank Martin 
Dr. F. W. Miller 
Edward Morphew 
James Morphew 
Leo Middleton 
Wm.. H. Morris 
Cecil J. Murphy 
Clyde Needham 
Otto Olson 
George Osbaugh 



SCOTT'S ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL MERCHANDISE 

REPAIRS AMD SERVICE 

CONTRACTING 

FRIGIDAIRE - APPLIANCES - HOTPOINT 
PHONE 2751 

PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 



69 YEARS OF SERVICE 



IN PROPHETSTOWN 



C. W. FENN & SON 



DEPENDABLE SINCE 1890 



Logan Pense 
Gordon Reynolds 
Lester Roth 
Fulton Seeley 
Gail Undsrhill 
Elmer Vamey 
Keith Warner 
Harry Zarr 

Leon Cemetery 

Joe Copeland 

Fern Stewart 

Wm. Leroy Weaks 

Jack Woclums 

H~nry Blumhofi — Erie 

William Carlson — Meuse — 

Argonne 
A. E. Etnyre — Clinton, Iowa 
Alphonse Hermie — Tampico 
Carl McDougall — Genesee 
Roy Thompson — Lyndon 



WORLD WAR II 
Riverside Cemetery 

D. L. Anderson 

Lester Ackeberg 

Donald Dronenberg 

Paul Dugosh 

Edward Frank Gibson 

Blaine Hannabarger 

Frank Majeski 

Edwin Pearson 

Clarence Sibley Jr. 

Stanley Sturtevant 

Sherman Suddarth 

Everett Franklin 

Robert Brooks and Anthony Van- 

Rycke lost their lives in the Phil 

lipines. 

Franklin Maihews is buried in 

Luxembourg 

William James — Erie Cemetery 

KOREAN CONFLICT 
Riverside Cemetery 

Charles Lindberg 
Earl Sawyer 



Congratulations 
PROPHETSTOWN 



FOREST INN 



Morrison, Illinois 



7:00 A.M. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 12:00 P.M. 

CHUCK'S PLACE 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE SANDWICHES 

HOME MADE PIES 




DAIRY PRODUCTS 



ICE CREAM 

PINTS - QUARTS HALF GALLONS BULK 




CHUCK" MULCAY, Owner 



PHILCO 




ALWAYS BETTER BUYS 

GAMBLES 

Everything for Home, Farm & Car 
Your Phiico Dealer 

ADRIAN HUNSBERGER 

DIAL 5511 



N-SURE 



B-SURE 



CAPITOL STOCK 



COMPANY INS. 

REICHARD'S AGENCY 

INSURANCE & REAL ESTATE 

320 WASHINGTON STREET 

PROPHETSTOWN, ILLINOIS 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



FARM LOANS 



Tampico Farmers Elevator Co. 



~ ■—"^ 




PHONE 55R2 



DEALERS IN AND SHIPPERS OF 



GRAIN, SEEDS, SALT, COAL, FERTILIZER 



PAUL WETZELL, President BALINE OLSON, Secretary 



EDWIN HOAR, Manager 




HOME OIL CO. 



McNeill twins 



ABE THOMPSON 



Headlines: 1931-1951 



Our silent sp'^ on the mountain norv scans the 
FiophetstoTvn Echo for headline stories of ow 
most recent past. To him the cycle of economic 
depression, rvar and prosperity is ageless repiti- 
iion. To us the headlines of a time mthin our 
memory may bring a chuckle or a tear. 




1931 In January of 1931 the Prophetstown Booster 
Club held its first community sale. More than five- 
hundred articles were sold and the total amount re- 
ceived was about $6,500. 

The winter of 1931 was very mild. The temper- 
ature reading on January 30 at 7 a.m. was 46 de- 
grees above zero. 

In Febraury the newly elected directors of the 
Whiteside County Service Company, which was 
being organized by the farmers, met in Morrison 
and elected officers. 

Plans were made by the legion to fix a swim- 
ming hole in Coon Creek. 

The summer of 1931 was very hot. The ice 
plant had a difficult time meeting demands. The 



heat wave was nation-wide with the temperature 
at or over 100 degrees for at least two weeks. There 
'>.-a=; very littl9 rain and water economy was urged. 
The city well was deepened. 



19G3 January 25 the Farmers National Bank 
takes a holiday along with all others in the nation. 
Depositors, by agreement, waive 30 percent of their 
deposits and bonk re-opens Febraury 6. 

Fifty gallons of bootleg alcohol confiscated by 
county sheriff was found to be of such good qual- 
ity that it was purchased by the Morrison and Ster- 
ling Hospitals for rubbing purposes. Heavy frost on 
June 14th. Illinois com yield averaged 26.5 bushels 
per acre — lowest in years. 





Tragic Flood of 1938 



STANLEY ROBINSON 

PHYSICIAN & SURGEON 



L M. DINGMAN 

VETERINARIAN 



DONALD L. SIPE 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 



VETERINARY CLINIC 

DRS. MEYER & COPELAND 



DR. 0. M. TOBY, Optometrist 

PROPHETSTOWN, ILL. 



1934 Brydia runs for representative of 35th dis- 
trict. Factory is producing 400 mowers per day. 
110 pound sturgeon seined at Lyndon. Talk of new 
highway bridge over river. Mosher and Oppendike 
steers top Chicago market at $10.25. 1534 Roosters 
and 1050 kids appear at Booster Club functions. 



1935 County plans to take the farmers out of 
the mud — all rural roads to be graveled. Beldin 
Manufacturing Co. opens. Forty-three Prophetstown 
families on relief. 



1936 Weather is the big news. Temperature 26 
degrees below zero on January 22nd. Heavy snows 
and 40 m.p.h. winds isolate the community for two 
days and bob sleds re-appear on main street. The 
month January 19th to Febraury 19th saw only 4 
days in which the temperature failed to fall below 
zero. 



1938 January 26 Rock River reaches all time 
high. A 2.48 inch rain on Sunday caused the 
river to rise to the pump house, 30 inches higher 
than ever before. Water froze causing many fam- 
ers a great loss in stock. Residents were warned 
not to drink the water even after boiling it. Level 
of river still climbed until it reached a high of only 
1 1 inches below the window of the pumping station. 

Harry Peterson was kidnapped and dumped 
in Rockford. His abductor was a kind one, howev- 
er and bought him gas and gave him $5 at the 
end of the trip. 

City votes bond issue 180-7 in favor of new 
sewage disposal plant. 



1939 George Brydia takes oath as representa- 
tive from the 35th district on January 4. 

Eclipse announces new super speed mower, 
the Rocket. 




Recognize Our 1939 Tug-O-War Champions? 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Kathryn's Beauty Shop 
Joe Matthews 
Thomas O'Leery 
Shirley's Beauty Shop 
Perkin's Shoe Repair 
Barnie Berge 
Armour & Co. 
Arline's Beauty Shop 
Terri's Beauty Shop 
Jake Klockenga 

Fix-it-Shop — Harry and Cecil Clementz 
Robert McKenna 
Robert Hummel— Painter 
Lenore's Beauty Shop 
Ray Schryver— Piano Tuner 
Donna Blackert — Stanley Products 



Leon Church observes 40th birthday. 

Firemen called to Sterling to fight blaze for six 
hours at the wire mill. 

City puts new sewage plant into operation at 
cost of $32,000. 

Harold Johnson and R. L. Cooper invent new 
re-fueling devise for airplanes and it was tested 
sucessfully in Erie. It was later used in an endur- 
ance flight that failed after some 40 hours. 



1940 Mrs. Margaret Fuller, oldest citizen, cele- 
brated her 91st birthday. 

High school plans to play six man football, the 
first time for the sport in many years. 

December 3 was recorded as the coldest for 
that date in the history of the Rock Island district 
weather bureau as the temperature plunged to 10 
degrees below zero. 

1941 Fred Hutchinson, son of Elias and Mary 
Hutchinson, passed away on March 2, 1941, at the 
age of ninety-one years. His parents settled here 
in 1839. 

Plat of the J. B. Mosher addition was accepted 
by the City Council on January 15. 

Two hundred people heard Glenn Cunningham 
at the athletic banquet on March 19th. 

On March 26th an announcement was made 
that football was scheduled for the first time in the 
Two Rivers Conference. 

In April a tornado struck in an area southwest 
of Prophetstown. 

On April 30th the New Defense Bonds were 
placed on sale for the first time. 

On June 1 1 the oldest landmark, the livery 
stable, was destroyed by fire. It was believed to 
have been built in 1870. It had been a stopping 
place for the old stage coach route which ran from 
Morrison through Prophetstown to Spring Hill. A 
route from Geneseo connected with it at Spring Hill 
and the horses were changed there for the return 
trips in each direction. 

On June 1 1 the first of a series of band concerts 
was held. Thirty-four members were in the band. 

July 30, Echo records a record heat wave with 
temperatures of 106 in the shade and 120 in the 
sun. The heat became so extreme at the Eclipse 
foundry that workmen began at 4 a.m. and quit at 
noon. The following weeks issue stated electric fans 
were no longer available as no more could be 
procured. 

On September 24 the Hotel Eureka closed, 
leaving Prophetstown without a hotel service after 
having operated for 75 years. 




"Look at the Birdie" 

1942 Deposits at Farmers National Bank reach 
31,000,000 for the first time. Sugar rationing begins. 
Ominous reports of boys lost in the Pacific begin to 
appear. 



1943 The city and township were quarantined 

for several weeks for rabies. 

The papers for this year were filled with events 
of World War II. Announcements of issuance of 
ration books, urging for all citizens to raise victory 
gardens, demonstrations of food preservation for 
the results of these back breaking efforts, grocery 
store deliveries curtailed because of gasoline and 
tire rationing — and most important, reports of the 
many young people in the armed forces. 



1944 

fever. 



Town was quarantined February 23 for 



1945 Community High School district formed. 
Eight Mile community struck by destructive tornado. 
War's end observed quietly and gratefully with in- 
formal ceremony on main street. 



1951 It was during the breaking up of the ice in 
February of 1951 that the power line was threat- 
ened. The pier in the river bearing the utilities 
tower was tilted by the weight of the moving ice. 

The Lutheran Church purchased the former Al- 
bert Field house located on the comer of Locust 
and West 3rd Streets. 

Ralph Williams Clark, a native son of Prophets- 
town and dean of the College of Pharmacy of 
the University of Oklahoma, was listed in the 1951 
"Who's Who". 

On Sunday, September 19, 1951, Bishop Magee 
of Chicago gave the morning sermon at the Metho- 
dist Church in observance of its 1 1 5th anniversary. 



A View From Thunderbolt 
by 

Helen Arians 

Don Brooks 

Dorothy Carlock 

Lela Chapin 

Rev. Fr, Robert P. Donovan 

F. L. Dudley 

Harry Eshelman 

Harry Hammond 

Hugo Hecht 

Ida Hecht ■'■ '- ^f 3 i.: i.\ _:• 

Verna Johnson ' -•" ' '■■^■ 

Livona Lindsay 

George Matthews 

Jennie Olmstead 

Vincent Olmstead 

LaRue Parrill 

Jewell Parrill 

Margaret Ping 

Donald L. Sipe ■ • ■■ ■■- 

Thelma J. Sipe 

Carl O. Swanson 

Vora Thicksten 

Dr. W. F. Tyler 

Arnold Waite 

Jessie Warner 

Glenn Wheat Jr. 

Dr. R. C. Woodworth 

Mrs. George Yager 

Illustrations 
Shirley Riemer 

Photography 
Don Brooks 
Merle Kemp 
John Sibley 



Conclusion 



The history of any ci:y is the history of individual lives and accomplishments 
attained through singular effort or through activities of religious, political, or socio] 
jroups. 

Soon after we began writing this book, it became apparent that we could not 
compile a history of Prophetstown. This would hove required a biographical sketch 
of every person, family, or group which has contributed to the success of our city. It 
was at this point that we determined to sketch the life or contribution of none of our 
people. Had we begun work on the book in 1950 this might have been possible. 

So, a history it is not; a centennial souvenier, we hope it is. 

We know that there are events, names, and places which are not mentioned 
and ought to have been. You may be assured that if we knew where these omissions 
were, they would not be omissions. None are intentional. 

Looking back a hundred years has been pleasant for us. As we complete the 
book we naturally begin to look to the future. A hundred years from now we will have 
Thunderbolt, but the view will have changed. The life most important to us — our own — 
will be fortunate to have attained the stature of a memory. But we are sure that all of 
the lives, remembered or not, will continue to broaden THE VIEW FROM THUNDER- 
BOLT. 

The Book Committee 



UNITED PACKING & GASKET 
ENGINEERING CORP. 

MAIN OFFICE - 5101-5111 OGDEN AVENUE 

Telephone Bishop 2-2590 

CICERO 50, ILL. 

Automotive and Industrial Gaskets 
Fabricated Packings 
Metallic Packings 

Automotive Packings 

Sheet Packing of All Kind 
Industrial Packing 
Die Making 

Die Specialty Cutting 




CONGRATULATIONS 
PROPHETSTOWN 

On Your 100th Anniversary 

FEDERATED STORE 

312 WASHINGTON ST. 




WESTERN AUTO 
Assoc. Store 



Friendly Family Store 



Gentz Sales & Service 




B tl I C K 



BUICK SALES & SERVICE 

APPLIANCES - FEEDERS - WATERERS 
SKELGAS SERVICE 

"ONE PRICE TO ALL" 



Phone 4421 



Prophetstown, Illinois 



CONGRATULATIONS 




PRESNELL TRUCKING CO. 



Roland "Shorty" Lyie 



SHULL'S 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING 
FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 

NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 
MERCHANDISE 

A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE 

RAY MILLER 



CONGRATU LATIONS 

T O 

THE CITY 

O F 

PROPHETSTOWN 

ON ITS 100th ANNIVERSARY 
Mr. and Mrs. Darrell G. Miller 

R.F.D. NO. 3 - Box 16 U 
PROPHETSTOWN, ILLINOIS 

Compliments of 

THE CHICAGO BURLINGTON QUINCY RR. 

THE RAIL WAY EXPRESS INC. 

THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 



National Dry Cleaners 

GUARANTEED QUALITY 
CLEANING 



Ladies' Dresses 




Men's Suits 




SHULL^S CLOTHING 

AGENCY 



BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

HOME OWNED - NATIONALLY OWNED 

The Store Where Your Dollars Make More 

Cents — A Complete Line of Gifts and 

Variety Store Items for Your Shopping Pleasure. 

It is Always A Pleasure to Serve You. 

ALLEN & ARLENE DeWEERDT 



Ronnie Pamella 



Doug 




WHITESIDE CO-OP. 



CHOICE BEEF 
CUTS OR QUARTERS 

DON BRACKEMYER, Plant Mgr. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO 

PROPHETSTOWN ON ITS 

100th ANNIVERSARY 

ROGER BAUER 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
FURNITURE 

Prophetstown 




Bender's Whiteside Station 



COMPLETE SERVICE - 
PICKUP & DELIVERY 

Phone 2701 



YOUR QUEEN WILL VISIT WITH US 

CONGRATULATIONS 
PROPHETSTOWN 




HEW YORK 



PLAN NOW FOR THE NEXT 100 YEARS 











"'\ 


,— --^ 








1 




u 




- 










PROGRESSING WITH PROPHETSTOWN SINCE 1872 

We Have Always Strived to Give Prompt, Efficient Service. 



Congratulations to Prophetstown on 100 Years of Progress 

See Us for Building Materials, Seed, Grain, Coal, 
Fertilizer, Paint & Ready-Mix Concrete. 



^RocK KivER Lumber ^ Grain Co. 

•NCOBroaATEO 

LUMBER 

irHliii) GRAINS COAL 






^^ r7C7 S.#WBIPROP"etstown.Ill 
Phone 2441 



t. ^ 
A.. 



SAUK VALLEY CC LIBRARY 



3 1516 00016 3301 



101805 
t 

.W4 A view from Thunder- 
P94 bolt 



■ 101805 

p^ view from Thunder- 
bolt 



F 


547 


.W4 


P94 




SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY 

R.R. 5 

Dixon, IL 61021 



CONGRA 



ON YOUR 



100'" ANNIVERSARY 



Beard Pontiac-Cadillac 



PROPHETSTOWN, ILLINOIS 



THE CHANGING ICENE 



HURRV WITH THAT 
PAIL OF WATER - 
THEN GET READV 
FOR VOUI^ BATH. 




NO HOT WATER PROBLEMS IN 1958 
WITH MODERN, FAST-RECOVERY 
LP-GAS WATER HEATERS. 



BETTERGAS CO. 



Distributors of 




BULK OR 
BOTTLE GAS 



THE ttl-PUDPOSE FUEL 



PLANTS AT: 

PROPHETSTOWN 

LASALLE 

KEWANEE 



FOR 



HOME HEATING 
COOKING 
CLOTHES DRYING 
REFRIGERATION 



• TRACTOR FUEL 

• STOCK TANK HEATING 

• CHICKEN BROODING 

• WEED BURNING